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Thread: AM & PM

  1. #1
    1364's Avatar
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    Question AM & PM

    Hi everybody;

    Would you please tell me what does these abbreviations stand for ?

    (1) AM (2) PM

    ( I mean abbr which is used for “time” )

    Thanks amillion

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    Smile Re: AM & PM

    AM: ante meridian
    PM: post meridian



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    Tomasz Klimkiewicz is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: AM & PM

    More exactly

    AM stands for 'ante meridiem', Latin 'before noon', and is used to express the time after midnight (00:00 hours) till noon (12:00 hours) while

    PM stands for 'post meridiem', Latin 'past noon', and, consequently, is used to express the time between noon (12:00) and midnight (00:00).

    Examples:

    By saying '3 PM' we mean 15:00 hours, while '3 AM' is 3 o'clock in the morning.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards
    Tee Kay

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    Wink Re: AM & PM

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomasz Klimkiewicz
    More exactly

    AM stands for 'ante meridiem', Latin 'before noon', and is used to express the time after midnight (00:00 hours) till noon (12:00 hours) while

    PM stands for 'post meridiem', Latin 'past noon', and, consequently, is used to express the time between noon (12:00) and midnight (00:00).

    Examples:

    By saying '3 PM' we mean 15:00 hours, while '3 AM' is 3 o'clock in the morning.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards
    Tee Kay
    dear Tomasz Klimkiewicz;
    thank ya very very much

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    Default Re: AM & PM

    Additionally, the appropriate forms are:

    a.m.
    p.m.

    All the best,

  6. #6
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    Question Re: AM & PM

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Additionally, the appropriate forms are:

    a.m.
    p.m.

    All the best,
    Thanks amillion dear Casiopea; but don't ya think (pm & am )is more common than a.m. & p.m.
    thanks again

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    Default Re: AM & PM

    All of these are common: (in no particular order)

    [1] AM/PM (ante/post meridiem)
    [2] am/pm (ante/post meridiem)
    [3] a.m./p.m. (ante/post meridiem)

    but you won't find [1] or [2] in a dictionary. Here's what you will find:

    Acronyms:
    PM, Prime Minister
    AM, Amplitude Modulation

    Verb:
    am, 1st person singular present of BE.

    Abbreviations:
    a.m., ante meridiem
    p.m., post meridiem

    'ante' and 'post' are prefixes, not whole words - even though they're written that way.

    Would confusion result if a speaker chose to use am instead of a.m.? Probably not; context is everything; e.g., 5 a.m. ~ 5 am. Mind you, sans context, there's a potential for ambiguity to arise. For example, am (ante meridiem) and "am" (I am) are homographs. The phrase, "In the am" could initially be read as, "In the [aem]", as in "I am". Why not choose a form that doesn't result in ambiguity? There wouldn't be ambiguity with pm ~ p.m., but am and pm are a set pair, so they follow the same rules. If a.m., then p.m.

    Consistency rules.

    In short, [1] through [3] below are common; two are ambiguous.

    [1] AM (ante meridiem or Amplitude Modulation)
    [2] am (ante meridiem or 1st person singular present of BE)
    [3] a.m. (ante meridiem)

    [1] is an acronym and a homophone, and [2] is a whole word and a homograph. Context will determine their exact meaning, whereas that's certainly not the case for [3]. It's clear - sans context.

    Ambiguity has everything to do with why some speakers feel the need to clarify their usage. I direct you to the words in brackets (. . .):
    Quote Originally Posted by 1364
    (1) AM (2) PM (I mean abbr which is used for “time”)
    Hope that helps.

  8. #8
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    Question Re: AM & PM

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    All of these are common: (in no particular order)

    [1] AM/PM (ante/post meridiem)
    [2] am/pm (ante/post meridiem)
    [3] a.m./p.m. (ante/post meridiem)

    but you won't find [1] or [2] in a dictionary. Here's what you will find:

    Acronyms:
    PM, Prime Minister
    AM, Amplitude Modulation

    Verb:
    am, 1st person singular present of BE.

    Abbreviations:
    a.m., ante meridiem
    p.m., post meridiem

    'ante' and 'post' are prefixes, not whole words - even though they're written that way.

    Would confusion result if a speaker chose to use am instead of a.m.? Probably not; context is everything; e.g., 5 a.m. ~ 5 am. Mind you, sans context, there's a potential for ambiguity to arise. For example, am (ante meridiem) and "am" (I am) are homographs. The phrase, "In the am" could initially be read as, "In the [aem]", as in "I am". Why not choose a form that doesn't result in ambiguity? There wouldn't be ambiguity with pm ~ p.m., but am and pm are a set pair, so they follow the same rules. If a.m., then p.m.

    Consistency rules.

    In short, [1] through [3] below are common; two are ambiguous.

    [1] AM (ante meridiem or Amplitude Modulation)
    [2] am (ante meridiem or 1st person singular present of BE)
    [3] a.m. (ante meridiem)

    [1] is an acronym and a homophone, and [2] is a whole word and a homograph. Context will determine their exact meaning, whereas that's certainly not the case for [3]. It's clear - sans context.

    Ambiguity has everything to do with why some speakers feel the need to clarify their usage. I direct you to the words in brackets (. . .):

    Hope that helps.
    yes thanks you are totally right
    best wishes

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