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Thread: roast chicken

  1. #1
    mochimochi is offline Junior Member
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    Default roast chicken

    I have a question about roast chicken.

    "A nice roast chicken is my favorite dish."

    Is this correct? I think "chicken" is a uncountable noun when it is food, so "A" isn't necessary.

    To be sure, a roast chicken could be used as "a whole chicken" , such as "two roast chickens are served", but the sentence in question doesn't mean a whole chicken.

    Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    We say 'Roast chicken is my favourite dish', but if we want to put an adjective in front of it it's 'A nice roast chicken. . .'

    '...but the sentence in question doesn't mean a whole chicken.'
    Yes, it does.

    If you don't want it to mean that, say 'A nice roast chicken leg or breast . . .'

    Rover

  3. #3
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    Rover, side point, but would you say "roast" chicken or "roasted" chicken?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Rover, side point, but would you say "roast" chicken or "roasted" chicken?
    I don't know about Rover, but I'd use 'roast'; I have never heard a speaker of BRE speak of 'roasted' chicken, or anything else, when the word is used before the noun.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    Interesting.
    Grilled pork chops
    Baked Alaska
    Sauteed mushrooms
    Broiled lamp chops
    Roasted chicken

    Roast sounds so odd to me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Interesting.
    Grilled pork chops
    Baked Alaska
    Sauteed mushrooms
    Broiled lamp chops
    Roasted chicken

    Roast sounds so odd to me.
    It looks odd there, but it sounds natural to me. 'Roasted chicken' suggests to me a live hen that has been standing in front of an open fire too long.

    'Broiled' is a very odd-sounding word to British people of my generation, though I believe that younger speakers of BrE use it.

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    We all agree there is "roast beef." It seems "roast" has made its way to adjective without the "-ed."

    I am steadfast in my conviction that it is "iced tea."

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    Roast chicken here too- roasted sounds odd to me.. You could say a chicken roasted on a spit.

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I am steadfast in my conviction that it is "iced tea."
    I think both are used, though I use iced and iced coffee sounds right where ice coffee doesn't to me,

  10. #10
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: roast chicken

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I think both are used, though I use iced and iced coffee sounds right where ice coffee doesn't to me,
    I know people write "ice tea" but I believe that is an error. The way the word is said doesn't make for a clear distinction between "ice" and "iced." But it is tea that is iced. It is iced tea. Toast that is burnt is burnt toast, not burn toast.

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