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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #1

    [pronunciation] in tommorow

    Hello.

    I heard that like /inəmɒrəʊ/ from a film where t was dropped.
    Is it common among English speakers or it is specific?
    Should I say like that being non native speaker?

    Thanks, Alex.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    I cannot imagine any native speaker dropping that T unless he (or she) had food in his mouth or was trying to talk while brushing his teeth.

    Pronounce the T in tomorrow.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    In what context would someone say, "in tomorrow"?

    Oh; we might say, "There is only one m in 'tomorrow'", but then we would pronounce 'tomorrow' quite carefully.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    We'll cover that in tomorrow's seminar?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    Can you cover for me, I'm not going to be in tomorrow?

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    Thanks, Barb and Dave. I clearly was not being very creative today.

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    #7

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    I had the same first reaction, that it seemed an odd preposition to use with tomorrow.

  6. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    The actor said, 'I'll phone you in tomorrow'. Could I give you a little sound file so that you may be hear what he said? Some Englishmen drop h so why t can't be dropped?
    Attached Files Attached Files

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    The actor said, 'I'll phone you in tomorrow'. Could I give you a little sound file so that you may be hear what he said?
    Well, there certainly does not appear to be a /t/ there. In answer to your original question: it is most uncommon among English speakers.

    Some Englishmen drop h so why t can't be dropped?
    It's a different process. /h/ is , phonetically, a (usually) voiceless vowel, while /t/ is a plosive/stop .

    When /h/ follows a consonant, it is often dropped in the move to the following vowel, even by 'educated' speakers in informal conversation, though many deny it. In what is considered by many to be uneducated speech, the /h/ is normally replaced by a glottal stop before the first vowel when it begins an utterance.

    /t/ may be replaced, in some dialects by a glottal stop, but it is never dropped - by most speakers. I would have not added the word 'by most speakers' if I had not heard your clip.
    Last edited by 5jj; 03-Jun-2011 at 11:58. Reason: typo: 'stp' should have been 'stop'

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    #10

    Re: [pronunciation] in tommorow

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Well, there certainly does not appear to be a /t/ there. In answer to your original question: it is most uncommon among English speakers.

    It's a different process. /h/ is , phonetically a (usually) voiceless vowel, while /t/ is a plosive/stp .

    When /h/ follows a consonant, it is often dropped in the move to the following vowel, even by 'educated' speakers in informal conversation, though many deny it. In what is considered by many to be uneducated speech, the /h/ is normally replaced by a glottal stop before the first vowel when it begins an utterance.

    /t/ may be replaced, in some dialects by a glottal stop, but it is never dropped - by most speakers. I would have not added the word 'by most speakers' if I had not heard your clip.
    thank you for the explanation.

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