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  1. #11
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: ill logic or ill-logic instead of illogic

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    Hi BC

    To add to what the other folks have said...

    The prefix "ill-" in "illogical" has the same relationship to the word "ill" as it does in "illegal" or "illegitimate" - i.e. none!

    It merely negates the word, in the same way as similar prefixes in: innoxious, impenetrable, ignoble, irrefutable, irrevocable, invariable.

    Hope this helps
    R21
    There's a rule; but learning the rule takes almost as long as learning all the apprent exceptions. And even then, there's still an exception: ignoble.

    If you think of the prefix as 'iN-', then you can use these transformations:

    'iN- + <word>' -> 'in + word. (e.g. inactive, incapable, indecent, inequitable, infamous, ingratitude, inhospitable... etc)

    UNLESS the following word or morpheme starts with one of these:
    • bilabial consonant, then 'iN- + <word>' -> 'im + <adj>' (improbable,imbecile, immaculate etc)
    • 'l', then 'iN- + <word>' -> 'il + <word>' (illogical, illegal etc.)
    • 'r', then 'iN- + <word>' -> 'ir + <word>' (irregular, irredeemable, etc)


    The apparent counter-example 'inbred' isn't, because its 'in-' prefix isn't the same as the polarity-reversing 'iN-' prefix.

    b

  2. #12
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: ill logic or ill-logic instead of illogic

    Sorry, I should have made it clear that I was not connecting "illogic" to "ill logic". I simply meant in the original post that, when spoken, the two sound very similar. I also should have pointed out that I have not heard "ill logic" used since about 1987 when my A Level English teacher used to use it quite regularly. I too wouldn't encourage its use. "Flawed logic" is indeed much better.

    I shouldn't post when I haven't had much sleep!

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