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  1. #1
    KLPNO is offline Senior Member
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    Default In justice to myself,

    Hello everyone.

    I'd like to ask about the meaning of "in justice to myself" in the following sentence:

    In justice to myself, I think it well to state that this work has been somewhat hastily prepared from the notes used by me in certain of lectures, the lessons give herein practically being the syllabi of the said lectures.

    Does the phrase in question mean "as an excuse/justification for myself", "I would like to justify myself"?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: In justice to myself,

    Was this written by a native speaker?

    That would be the intent, but it's not a phrase I've ever seen used before.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    Route21's Avatar
    Route21 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: In justice to myself,

    As a NES (BrE), but not a teacher, I would have no problem understanding, or using the expression, but would probably only use it to justify the position of others (a third party). Depending on the circumstances, I might soften it slightly to say: "In [all] fairness to ....". or "to be [perfectly] fair".

    I would use it in a situation where the "reader" may not be aware that a statement was made based on the best, then current, information available to the original writer, under the circumstances.

    In the (non-third party) case concerned, I would have probably simply replaced "In justice to myself, I think it well to state that" with "Please note that ....".

    Hope this helps
    R21

    PS See also
    : http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ess-wrong.html

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    KLPNO is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: In justice to myself,

    Barb_D, Route21, thank you very much for your replies.

    The phrase in question is from the book by William Walker Atkinson.
    Thought-Force in Business and Everyday Life

    Also, I found this expression in the famous book by Wilkie Collins (The Moonstone).
    The moonstone

    I had been in a burning fever, a moment since, and in some doubt what to do next. I became extremely cold now, and felt no doubt whatever. To show myself, after what I had heard, was impossible. To retreat--except into the fireplace-- was equally out of the question. A martyrdom was before me. In justice to myself, I noiselessly arranged the curtains so that I could both see and hear. And then I met my martyrdom, with the spirit of a primitive Christian.

    "Don't sit on the ottoman," the young lady proceeded. "Bring a chair, Godfrey. I like people to be opposite to me when I talk to them."

    He took the nearest seat. It was a low chair. He was very tall, and many sizes too large for it. I never saw his legs to such disadvantage before.

    "Well?" she went on. "What did you say to them?"

    "Just what you said, dear Rachel, to me."

    I have to admit I don't understand the meaning of "In justice to myself" in the Moonstone. What does this expression mean here?

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