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Thread: Cape Fear

  1. #1
    Aristotle is offline Newbie
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    Default Cape Fear

    hi teachers,
    I appreciate your times and efforts.






    I have seen a movie entitled as: "cape fear"

    my questions are :

    1. Isn't "cape" a noun in this context, and if it is so, why does it precede the noun "fear". In other words, shoudn't the title be like this "cape fear".


    2.Can adjectives be plural ( I mean in general).

    for example, can I say :I wrote down the employees' e-mails
    or : I wrote down the employee's e-mails

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    Nouns can functions as adjectives (shoe shop). Here, it is a name, isn't it?
    Adjectives don't take a plural. In your example, 'employees' is a noun and the position of the apostrophe depends on the number of employees:
    I wrote down the employees' e-mails (more than employee)
    I wrote down the employee's e-mails (one employee)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    In addition, cape refers to a headland, a geographical point, and it was usually followed by 'of'; e.g., the Cape of Good Hope ~ Good Hope's cape ~ Cape Good Hope. So, cape of fear ~ cape fear ~ fear's cape. Scary movie, huh?

    By the way, here's a trick: if the word has an apostrophe ('), it's not an adjective. Apostrophes are found on nouns and pronouns:

    EX: He's giving me Max's book. (Pronoun: He; Noun: Max)
    => He is giving me the book that belongs to Max.

    Welcome.

  4. #4
    Aristotle is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Nouns can functions as adjectives (shoe shop). Here, it is a name, isn't it?
    Adjectives don't take a plural. In your example, 'employees' is a noun and the position of the apostrophe depends on the number of employees:
    I wrote down the employees' e-mails (more than employee)
    I wrote down the employee's e-mails (one employee)
    The picture still little opaque for me,dear.

    In your example-"shoe shop"-,can "shoe" be plural in this context?

    thanks for patience.

  5. #5
    Aristotle is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    In addition, cape refers to a headland, a geographical point, and it was usually followed by 'of'; e.g., the Cape of Good Hope ~ Good Hope's cape ~ Cape Good Hope. So, cape of fear ~ cape fear ~ fear's cape. Scary movie, huh?

    By the way, here's a trick: if the word has an apostrophe ('), it's not an adjective. Apostrophes are found on nouns and pronouns:

    EX: He's giving me Max's book. (Pronoun: He; Noun: Max)
    => He is giving me the book that belongs to Max.

    Welcome.
    hi Casiopea,
    1. I can infer from yuor post that "of" is omitted and the correct phrase is "Cape of Fear", isn't it?

    2. In "Fear's Cape",Fear shuoldn't be with apostrophe becuase it isn't a human's nor animal's name. ( I think like that I am not sure)

    Many thanks

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle
    The picture still little opaque for me,dear.

    In your example-"shoe shop"-,can "shoe" be plural in this context?

    thanks for patience.
    No, it can't- though 'shoe' is normally a noun, it functionas as an adjective here. With compound nouns, we can use the plural is the noun is generally used in the plural (sports hall) or with some nouns related to people (women politicians). Otherwise, we generally treat the noun as an adjective and do not make it plural:
    one shoe shop
    two shoe shops

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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle
    1. I can infer from your post that "of" is omitted and the correct phrase is "Cape of Fear", isn't it?
    The correct phrase is Cape Fear. It's the title of the movie. There isn't a cape called "Fear". If there were, it may have originally been called Cape of Fear, then shortened to Cape Fear.
    2. In "Fear's Cape", Fear shouldn't be with apostrophe because it isn't a human's nor animal's name. (I think like that I am not sure)
    That's the traditional way of dealing with 'of', yes.

    Please note, "dear" is a diminutive; it implies affection, specifically when speaking to children, the elderly, especially females, and someone you know well, like your wife or a female friend. Use 'dear' in other contexts, though, say, to a male you don't know, and even to a male you do know, and its implication might get you into hot water. It expresses smallness; i.e., the person may assume you think s/he is below you.

  8. #8
    Aristotle is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    I would like to thank both of you for helping and clarifying those quistions.


    Also special thanks for Casiopea for notifying me about that lapse
    and I really apologyze to tdol for that word. I just wanted to show some respect to him as the editor of this terrefic site.

    I look forward to forgiving me both of you.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Cape Fear

    There's no need to apologize. We're teachers. We understand. We want you to look and sound your best.

    Try,

    I appreciate your time and effort. (no need to use plural 'times' or 'efforts')

    All the best,

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