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    #1

    Post benefits to doing something?

    Dear teachers,

    "In fact, he thinks there are certain benefits to having a nonnative speaker as a language teacher."

    I'm not sure what this sentence means, especially, why we're using 'to having' instead of 'to have' or 'of having'? Would you please explain it for me?

    Here the use of 'benefits to having a ...' is similar to the 'to' in the following sentence?

    "My trip to the south was of much benefit to my health."

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    #2

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Heidi View Post
    "In fact, he thinks there are certain benefits to having a non-native speaker as a language teacher."

    I'm not sure what this sentence means, especially, why we're using 'to having' instead of 'to have' or 'of having'? Would you please explain it for me?
    'To' is not part of a 'to'-infinitive in this sentence. Both 'in' and 'of' would be possible.

    Here the use of 'benefits to having a ...' is similar to the 'to' in the following sentence?

    "My trip to the south was of much benefit to my health."
    Yes. The preposition is followed by a noun, pronoun or verbal noun (=gerund, 'ing'-form)
    5

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    #3

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I'm not sure what this sentence means, especially, why we're using 'to having' instead of 'to have' or 'of having'? Would you please explain it for me?
    'To' is not part of a 'to'-infinitive in this sentence. Both 'in' and 'of' would be possible.
    I'm not sure if you're calling "to" wrong here. I would.

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    #4

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    "Having" is a gerund.

    A gerund is a part of speech which is part noun and part verb.

    It's easy to see the verb part since 'having' is of form of the verb 'have."

    The noun part is a little more difficult. It might be a easier to see
    if we change the sentence a little,

    "In fact, he thinks there are certain benefits to the having of a nonnative speaker as a language teacher."

    This is still a grammatically correct, if a little strange, sentence.

    Now you can see that 'having' follows the article 'the' so it must function as a noun.

    So you may now see that 'having' meets the definition of a gerund

    Gerunds can play several roles in a sentence, one of which is as the
    object of a preposition, as it does here. It is the object of the preposition
    'to.'

    The meaning of the sentence should be much easier for you to understand.

    The writer is probably going to continue by twriting about ways he/she thinks it is better (there are benefits) to have a non-native speaker as a
    teacher.

    The simple, if not very satisfying, answer to your last question is that the sentence you quote doesn't require a gerund.

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    #5

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'm not sure if you're calling "to" wrong here. I would.
    It did not strike me as wrong when I read it. Now that you have mentioned it, I suppose it is.

    If we speak of the benefits to somebody, they are the people who enjoy the benefits. Strangely, I find that a sentence such as "I find many benefits to having a car" not as obviously unacceptable as I would have expected.

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    #6

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    It did not strike me as wrong when I read it. Now that you have mentioned it, I suppose it is.

    If we speak of the benefits to somebody, they are the people who enjoy the benefits. Strangely, I find that a sentence such as "I find many benefits to having a car" not as obviously unacceptable as I would have expected.
    I can see that there might be benefits to you in having a car. Perhaps "to" in your sentence just sounds unexceptional because so many people say it. I can't see the grammatical justification for the usage though - or the benefits to it [sic].

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    #7

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I can see that there might be benefits to you in having a car. Perhaps "to" in your sentence just sounds unexceptional because so many people say it. I can't see the grammatical justification for the usage though - or the benefits to it [sic].
    Raymott, do you consider

    That's all there is to it.

    incorrect too?

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    #8

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Raymott, do you consider

    That's all there is to it.

    incorrect too?
    No.

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    #9

    Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I can see that there might be benefits to you in having a car. Perhaps "to" in your sentence just sounds unexceptional because so many people say it. I can't see the grammatical justification for the usage though - or the benefits to it [sic].
    "Thers are many financial benifits to owning your own home." (Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary)

    I guess this sentence can be interpreted as 'there are many financial benefits to you in owning your own home'?

    Thank you!
    Last edited by Heidi; 10-Jun-2011 at 03:26.

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    #10

    Post Re: benefits to doing something?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I'm not sure what this sentence means, especially, why we're using 'to having' instead of 'to have' or 'of having'? Would you please explain it for me?
    'To' is not part of a 'to'-infinitive in this sentence. Both 'in' and 'of' would be possible.

    5
    "The benefits of having a nonnative speaker as a language teacher are numerous."

    Do you think the above sentence is acceptable?

    Thank you.

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