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  1. #1
    learnerr is offline Newbie
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    Prepositions ; silly question but help me out!

    Dear who could help me

    First, I know this is absolutely silly question but
    please help me with this one last problem I have.

    He forced my daughter on her knees.
    Is 'on her knees' solely function as adjective? or is 'TO BE' omitted and so is adverb?

    With you in this room, I'm totally disturbed.
    'In this room' ; does it work as adverb or adjective
    Last edited by learnerr; 09-Jun-2011 at 18:30.

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    Pokemon is offline Member
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    Re: Prepositions ; silly question but help me out!

    Quote Originally Posted by learnerr View Post
    Dear who could help me

    First, I know this is absolutely silly question but
    please help me with this one last problem I have.

    He forced my daughter on her knees.
    Is 'on her knees' solely function as adjective? or is 'TO BE' omitted and so is adverb?

    With you in this room, I'm totally disturbed.
    'In this room' ; does it work as adverb or adjective
    "Forced on her knees" seems to "function" like something terrible. Grammatically it looks like a predicative complex comprising 'my daughter as the nominal part and 'on her knees' as the predicative part. I think it's something similar to 'X made Y do smth' known as a complex object construction.

    "With you in this room', a less dramatic scene, no doubt, looks like a so-called nominative absolute participial construction. You may ask:where's the participle? It's omitted but can easily be supplied: 'With you being in this room'. As for the 'in this room', it's a noun phrase used as an adverbial modifier of place.

  3. #3
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: Prepositions ; silly question but help me out!

    I would never say that someone forced someone "on" her knees, but rather forced her "to" her knees. A tremendous pressure on your shoulders, or a greatly swaying boat that makes it impossible to stay standing, or a person with a gun who says "Get on your knees!" could all "force you to my knees."

    I don't have answer for your original question, but your original sentence is just too unnatural to go without comment.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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