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  1. #1
    symaa is offline Member
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    Question Places of articulation

    Hello,
    How are you today,I hope you have a great day.

    My question is about the places of articulation

    So,


    1*The palato-alveolar sounds inculde /ʃ/ /ʒ/ /tʃ/ /dʒ/
    But other confine it in just two consonants /ʃ/ /ʒ/


    2*The Alveolar sounds:/t/ /d/ /s/ /z/ /n/ /l/
    The other add the sound /r/

    3*Glottal sounds: /h/, /a/ just /h/

    Is it a question of which english accent do you use?

    And what about /w/?


    Sources:

    Describing consonants

    http://www.apec-elearning.org/mst/tm...undchanges.pdf
    and other....

    Excuse me for my lengthy thread


    All the best

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Places of articulation

    1The palato-alveolar sounds include the fricatives /ʃ/ /ʒ/, and the affricates /tʃ/ /dʒ/


    2*The Alveolar sounds:/t/ /d/ /s/ /z/ /n/ /l/

    /l/ could be classed as an alveolar sound; it is generally known as a lateral approximant,

    In standard BrE RP, /r/ is a post-alveolar approximant, but it can be rendered in other dialects as an alveolar tap, a lingual trill, an uvular trill or an uvular fricative

    And what about /w/? It's a labio-velar approximant.

  3. #3
    symaa is offline Member
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    Default Re: Places of articulation

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    1The palato-alveolar sounds include the fricatives /ʃ/ /ʒ/, and the affricates /tʃ/ /dʒ/


    2*The Alveolar sounds:/t/ /d/ /s/ /z/ /n/ /l/

    /l/ could be classed as an alveolar sound; it is generally known as a lateral approximant,

    In standard BrE RP, /r/ is a post-alveolar approximant, but it can be rendered in other dialects as an alveolar tap, a lingual trill, an uvular trill or an uvular fricative

    And what about /w/? It's a labio-velar approximant.
    Thank you very much sir for your detailed answer, you are always too helpful.

    Thank you again and again.

    Respectfully yours

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Places of articulation

    Quote Originally Posted by symaa View Post
    Thank you very much sir for your detailed answer
    You're welcome - glad the answer was helpful.

    ps. Please don't call me 'sir'. Some of us know a little bit more about English than others in this forum, but we are all just members or visitors, and most of us are learners in some way.

    Titles such as 'Junior Member', 'VIP' member' etc are just a bit of fun. They simply mean that one has the time and inclination to answer, or ask, a number of questions - and/or to write a lot of limericks, or play a lot of games.

  5. #5
    symaa is offline Member
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    Default Re: Places of articulation

    [QUOTE=fivejedjon;762135]You're welcome - glad the answer was helpful.

    ps. Please don't call me 'sir'. Some of us know a little bit more about English than others in this forum, but we are all just members or visitors, and most of us are learners in some way.

    Titles such as 'Junior Member', 'VIP' member' etc are just a bit of fun. They simply mean that one has the time and inclination to answer, or ask, a number of questions - and/or to write a lot of limericks, or play a lot of games.You are too modest, teachers like you deserve more than 'Thanks.[/QUOTE]
    Excuse me for my multitude of questions because I have always ones concerning phonetics especially when I find different answers that make things more vague and complicated.
    My teacher taught us British English but he considered /r/ as an alveolar sound !!
    All the best
    Have a nice day
    Last edited by symaa; 13-Jun-2011 at 14:44.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Places of articulation

    Quote Originally Posted by symaa View Post
    Excuse me for my multitude of questions
    Don't worry about that - it's what the forum is here for

    because I have always ones concerning phonetics especially when I find different answers that make things more vague and complicated.
    There are few precise answers in speech. The IPA symbols represent certain precisely defined sounds, which are a useful guide to transcription, though some of them may not exist in exactly that form in most languages. A trained phonetician will use all sorts of supercript, subscript and diacritic symbols to try to represent exactly what sound has been uttered.

    When I say the word 'murdering', the sounds represented by the letter 'r' will sound very different indeed when uttered by speakers from, for example, New York, Dorset, Glasgow or Newcastle. Even if I say the word twice, trying to say it in exactly the same way each time, a spectogram will show tiny differences.

    My teacher taught us British English but he considered /r/ as an alveolar sound.
    It may have been an alveolar sound, in his dialect.
    5

  7. #7
    symaa is offline Member
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    Smile Re: Places of articulation

    Don't worry about that - it's what the forum is here for
    Thank you very much, really I feel ashamed when I ask too much questions.

    The IPA symbols represent certain precisely defined sounds, which are a useful guide to transcription, though some of them may not exist in exactly that form in most languages
    Yes,I find many symbols that we do not need them in transcription as the vowel diagram I have posted in the prevoius thread.

    It may have been an alveolar sound, in his dialect
    I do not no, he is non native speaker but he studied in great britain .

    Thank you for your clarification teacher.

    Best regards,

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