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    #1

    short of vs short on

    I know it is correct to say "I am short of money," or "He is short on brains/common sense/personality." It it also correct to say "I am short on money"? Or both are correct? What nuances are there? Thanks!

  1. Leandro-Z's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: short of vs short on

    "Short of money" means that you are lacking money. "Short on common sense" means that you are a fool. I would say that "short of" is usually used with concrete things, while "short on" with abstract nouns.

    I am short of milk.
    I am short of bread.
    I am short of paper.

    but...

    I am short on patience.
    I am short on honesty.
    Last edited by Leandro-Z; 18-Jun-2011 at 13:18.

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