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  1. #1
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Default Bob's your uncle

    In the American crime series Monk, Randy used the expression Bob's your uncle, and Captain Stottlemeyer, his boss, said 'What's that supposed to mean? I've never heard of it.'

    Bob's your uncle is an expression commonly used mainly in Britain and Commonwealth nations. Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions to mean, "And there you have it", or "You're all set". For example, "To make a ham sandwich, just put a piece of ham between two slices of buttered bread, and Bob's your uncle".
    (Wikipedia)

    How widely known do you think this saying is Stateside (or anywhere else for that matter), and would any of you worthy American contributors use it in conversation?

    Rover

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: Bob's your uncle

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    No. I've never heard of it either. It sounds like, "It's a piece of cake."
    Yes - or 'There you go' or 'You're good to go' or 'Job done.'

    Rover

  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Bob's your uncle

    I know of it, but have never heard anyone say it. I only know it from watching Blackadder and other British comedies. I would have to be in a particularly quirky mood and with the right people to ever say it.

  4. #4
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Bob's your uncle

    Bob's your uncle.

    Fairly common in the past in Aust/NZ but less so these days, I feel.
    The jokey version "... and Robert's your father's brother" is occasionally heard and in fact I overheard it in conversation earlier this week.

    not a teacher

  5. #5
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    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Bob's your uncle

    I've only heard AmE speakers use "Bob's your uncle" if they're poking fun at BrE. (OK, maybe I'm the only one that does it. ) For example, when relating to my American friends the time a British person tried to give me driving directions when I got lost trying to find Southport: "Just nip up the Wickershams, rally 'round the gorm and scumble, go right straight through the roundabout and Bob's your uncle, there you are!"

  6. #6
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Bob's your uncle

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    Bob's your uncle.

    Fairly common in the past in Aust/NZ but less so these days, I feel.
    The jokey version "... and Robert's your father's brother" is occasionally heard and in fact I overheard it in conversation earlier this week.

    not a teacher
    I think this expression is dying out. As you can imagine, I used to hear it quite a lot Recently, I've heard the jocular expanded version more often than the original.

    b

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Bob's your uncle

    May I be the first to add the full statement: "Bob's your uncle, Fanny's your aunt".

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