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  1. #1
    Dolphin01 is offline Newbie
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    Question Grammaticality Judgement required.

    Are both of these sentences correct?

    1) Compare your answers with a partner.

    2) Compare your answers with a partner's.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Grammaticality Judgement required.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dolphin01 View Post
    Are both of these sentences correct?

    1) Compare your answers with a partner.

    2) Compare your answers with a partner's.
    Yes, they are, but they mean different things.
    Can you work out the difference?

  3. #3
    Dolphin01 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Grammaticality Judgement required.

    No.
    I know that 2) is correct.
    But the first sentence seems odd to me because you can't compare your answers with a partner, i.e. compare things with a human being, for example.

    My guess is as follows :The first sentence could mean that you just have to check your answers with your partner without asking or seeing his or her own answers to the same questions, saying "Do you think I got this right? What do you think of my answer to this question?, etc."
    Last edited by Dolphin01; 27-Jun-2011 at 17:57.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Grammaticality Judgement required.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dolphin01 View Post
    No.
    I know that 2) is correct.
    But the first sentence seems odd to me because you can't compare your answers with a partner, i.e. compare things with a human being, for example.

    My guess is as follows :The first sentence could mean that you just have to check your answers with your partner without asking or seeing his or her own answers to the same questions, saying "Do you think I got this right? What do you think of my answer to this question?, etc."
    If the first sentence meant what you have said in your guess, then the word "compare" wouldn't be appropriate. If you're simply going to ask your partner what he/she thinks of your answers, then you would be discussing it with them, not comparing it.

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grammaticality Judgement required.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dolphin01 View Post
    No.
    I know that 2) is correct.
    But the first sentence seems odd to me because you can't compare your answers with a partner, i.e. compare things with a human being, for example.

    My guess is as follows :The first sentence could mean that you just have to check your answers with your partner without asking or seeing his or her own answers to the same questions, saying "Do you think I got this right? What do you think of my answer to this question?, etc."
    That's what I was thinking too. When you say, "You can't compare your answers with a partner", that only applies if you have already decided that the sentence must be read that in that way - which, of course, is begging the question. But there is nothing in the sentence, or the context you've given that mandates that the sentence be read that way.

    Conversely, you can compare your answers with a partner's without your partner's involvement (or even his knowledge). In that case, you are not comparing your answers with your partner.

    However, the context should make it clear what is meant. In the right context, either sentence could mean that both these elements were intended, ie. "With your partner, compare your answers to your partner's answers."

  6. #6
    Dolphin01 is offline Newbie
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    Question Re: Grammaticality Judgement required.

    1) Compare your answers with a partner.
    2) Compare your answers with a partner's.
    3) Compare your topic sentence with a partner's.

    1) and 3) are from Q Skills for Success Reading and Writing.

    1) Reread paragraph 5. Answer these questions. Then compare your answers with a partner.

    -What is the main idea?
    -How many supporting details are in the paragraph? What are they?

    3) Read a student's paragraph. Then write a topic sentence for the paragraph. Compare your topic sentence with a partner's.

    ___________________________
    ________________________________
    First of all, I usually don't like the new fashion trends.....

    **********************
    My question is that if the first sentence is right, why isn't the second sentence "Compare your topic sentence with a partner."?

    Are both of these sentences interchangeable in terms of meaning?

    1) Compare your answers with a partner. vs. Compare your answers with a partner's.
    3) Compare your topic sentence with a partner's. vs. Compare your topic sentence with a partner.

    I am a little confused. Why do they use "with a partner" in the first example, and why do they use "with a partner's" in the third example?

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grammaticality Judgement required.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dolphin01 View Post

    Are both of these sentences interchangeable in terms of meaning?
    No. Given a certain context, they might have close enough to the same meaning not to matter within that context.

    1) Compare your answers with a partner. vs. Compare your answers with a partner's.
    3) Compare your topic sentence with a partner's. vs. Compare your topic sentence with a partner.

    I am a little confused. Why do they use "with a partner" in the first example, and why do they use "with a partner's" in the third example?
    It could be something as simple as a typo. Or they could have the specific meanings discussed above.
    It's impossible to be sure about the author's intentions, and I don't think most students or teachers would make a distinction.

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