Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41
  1. #31
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    Quote Originally Posted by Roro

    Where are you from, M56? From North England?
    And what does this ...fghdfhdfh... mean?
    I'm from NW England, Irish family, Grammar schooled, trained as an actor, not teacher-trainer in ESL.

    <fghdfhdfh... >

    That was because I had made a double posting. I had to cut the text, but I could delete so I went to my keyboard and did this ...ghasngnfjbf, in order to leave text behind.

  2. #32
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    This would depend on who's speaking and who's listening.

    Let's say it's a public works manager for a town or a city. In this case, we can imagine he's speaking to his employees. They would understand what he means. They would add that to their list of things to do.

    If it's just someone walking along the path and commenting to a friend or talking to someone else in the park, then this statement is just an observation.
    I agree. The same sentence can be used as signaling obligation (root modality) or opinion (epistemic modality).
    Last edited by M56; 17-Sep-2005 at 18:01.

  3. #33
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    BTW, just as my fellow regionalists and I would not misread this, "“Baby Sale - lots of bargains”, so would we not misread this, "I need my shirt ironing". We would not imagine babies were being sold nor shirts ironing themselves. Such is the beauty of Pragmatics.
    Last edited by M56; 17-Sep-2005 at 19:05.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    ...trained as an actor...
    !!
    I think it's very difficult to learn how to relax, to know where to put your hands, in front of cameras or on stages, in the first place.
    Good for you!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    By the way I've heard recently about such a quite interesting phenomenon.

    #1 He must leave tomorrow.
    #2 He must be leaving tomorrow.

    #1 expresses a so-called root modality of the subject.

    #2 is ambiguous between the following two readings:
    (1) a root modality of the subject (roughly: 'he' has an obligation of being in a preparation of leaving, or something like that)
    (2) an epistemic modality of the speaker. 'Most probably.'

    Only #2 has epistemic reading, and I've heard that nobody knows why yet !

  6. #36
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    Quote Originally Posted by Roro
    !!
    I think it's very difficult to learn how to relax, to know where to put your hands, in front of cameras or on stages, in the first place.
    Good for you!
    LOL! Yes, that can be a problem. I guess that's why you see a lot of actors with a cigarette in their hand.

  7. #37
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    Quote Originally Posted by Roro
    By the way I've heard recently about such a quite interesting phenomenon.

    #1 He must leave tomorrow.
    #2 He must be leaving tomorrow.

    #1 expresses a so-called root modality of the subject.

    #2 is ambiguous between the following two readings:
    (1) a root modality of the subject (roughly: 'he' has an obligation of being in a preparation of leaving, or something like that)
    (2) an epistemic modality of the speaker. 'Most probably.'

    Only #2 has epistemic reading, and I've heard that nobody knows why yet !
    Yes, you are correct there. The second example can be either supposition/deduction or obligation - though as obligation it would probably appear with "by" and "at the latest", which would resolve the ambiguity.

    He must be leaving by tomorrow at the latest.
    Last edited by M56; 18-Sep-2005 at 10:35.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    Aha! I've read in 'Wikipedia' the article on 'gerund.'

  9. #39
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    Quote Originally Posted by Roro
    Aha! I've read in 'Wikipedia' the article on 'gerund.'
    Which means?

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Volition and shirts

    It would be a bit off-topic, I'm afraid, so I sent you a PM, M56.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk