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  1. #1
    GUEST2008 is offline Key Member
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    Default bidding her prepare ...

    Hi

    A certain lady received a letter from assurance company.

    Like everyone else in the British Isles, she had from time
    to time received admonitory communications from
    various assurance companies, bidding her prepare for a
    comfortable old age, to insure against fire and flood, to
    make certain, in the event of her sudden demise, that her
    dependents would not be doomed to starvation.

    Does it mean they offered to take care of her when she's old ...

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    bidding her = urging her to, suggesting that she
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    shroob is offline Member
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    A certain lady received a letter from assurance company.

    Like everyone else in the British Isles, she had from time
    to time received admonitory communications from
    various assurance companies, bidding her to prepare for a
    comfortable old age, to insure against fire and flood, to
    make certain, in the event of her sudden demise, that her
    dependents would not be doomed to starvation.

    Does it mean they offered to take care of her when she's old ...
    Not a teacher only a native.

    Not exactly, I wouldn't say life assurance companies take care of you when you are old, they are similar to life insurance but are slightly different.

    The life assurance company is soliciting for her custom. They want her to take out a policy with them.

    'Bidding her to prepare for a comfortable old age....' could be 'Inviting her to prepare for a comfortable old age...[by taking out a policy with them].

    I have added 'to' into the text as I think this is necessary.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    Quote Originally Posted by shroob View Post
    Not a teacher only a native.

    Not exactly, I wouldn't say life assurance companies take care of you when you are old, they are similar to life insurance but are slightly different.

    The life assurance company is soliciting for her custom. They want her to take out a policy with them.

    'Bidding her to prepare for a comfortable old age....' could be 'Inviting her to prepare for a comfortable old age...[by taking out a policy with them].

    I have added 'to' into the text as I think this is necessary.

    I disagree with your last statement. I don't think "to" is required at all.

    I bid you come with me.
    He bid me leave the room.

    And, of course, we have the use of "bid", not followed by a verb:

    I bid you goodnight.

  5. #5
    shroob is offline Member
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I disagree with your last statement. I don't think "to" is required at all.

    I bid you come with me.
    He bid me leave the room.

    And, of course, we have the use of "bid", not followed by a verb:

    I bid you goodnight.
    Those examples sound correct, however to my ear '... bidding her prepare for a comfortable....'.

    '...bidding her TO prepare for a comfortable...' sounds better to me.

    Have I simply misunderstood the use of the word?

  6. #6
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I disagree with your last statement. I don't think "to" is required at all.

    I bid you come with me.
    He bid me leave the room.

    And, of course, we have the use of "bid", not followed by a verb:

    I bid you goodnight.
    I agree completely, no "to" is necessary or desirable. It sounds clunky with it.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    One of my favourite Shakespearean quotes, from Much Ado About Nothing:

    "Against my will, I am sent to bid you come into dinner."

  8. #8
    shroob is offline Member
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    One of my favourite Shakespearean quotes, from Much Ado About Nothing:

    "Against my will, I am sent to bid you come into dinner."
    In this example, 'request' could act as a synonym, right? So if we put 'requesting' into the original text, '...requesting her prepare for...', this sounds wrong to me. 'Requesting her to prepare for'... sounds better.

    Though am I wrong again? Have I have totally misunderstood the way the word is used? Could you try and explain why 'to' isn't needed?

    I'm sorry for suggesting something that is wrong, however I don't understand why it is wrong.

    Is 'bidding' being used as an imperative?

    Thanks for the clarification and appologies for the mistake.

  9. #9
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    Quote Originally Posted by shroob View Post
    In this example, 'request' could act as a synonym, right? So if we put 'requesting' into the original text, '...requesting her prepare for...', this sounds wrong to me. 'Requesting her to prepare for'... sounds better.
    The whole question of synonymy is taken far too seriously.
    No one is saying that '...requesting her prepare for...' is right.

  10. #10
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: bidding her prepare ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The whole question of synonymy is taken far too seriously.
    No one is saying that '...requesting her prepare for...' is right.
    Indeed so! And "... requesting that she prepare for ..." would sound much better anyway, and still wouldn't require "to".

    As far as why "to" isn't required, I've no idea. My only guess (and it is just that) is that originally it might have been followed with direct speech.

    Against my will, I am sent to bid you "Come into dinner".

    In fact, in the version of Much Ado About Nothing that I have seen more often than any other, that is exactly how the actress in question chooses to phrase it, but in the actual text it is simply written "Against my will, I am sent to bid you come into dinner".

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