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Thread: miserable sod

  1. #1
    maiabulela is offline Senior Member
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    Default miserable sod

    Dear all,

    What is the meaning of "miserable sod"?

    The context is British and the Sentence is:

    "They'll have Hopkins and Jones and Grant; miserable sod. Now, who have we got on our side?"

    I don't know what "miserable sod" refers to? They are speaking about 3 people and "sod" is singular. That is confusing.

    ** Before it was a semi colon.

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    Default Re: miserable sod

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    Dear all,

    What is the meaning of "miserable sod"?

    The context is British and the Sentence is:

    "They'll have Hopkins and Jones and Grant; miserable sod. Now, who have we got on our side?"

    I don't know what "miserable sod" refers to? They are speaking about 3 people and "sod" is singular. That is confusing.

    ** Before it was a semi colon.
    I assume that the semi-colon should be a comma, and that it is Grant who is the miserable sod. A miserable sod is a curmudgeonly, misanthropic, tight-fisted person. Generally speaking, it is not considered to be a complimentary term. However, I feel that this is due to a misunderstanding - I am sure that the vast number of people who apply it to me must prove that it is, in fact, complimentary. If you disagree with that opinion, you are an uneducated, ignorant peasant.

  3. #3
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: miserable sod

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I assume that the semi-colon should be a comma, and that it is Grant who is the miserable sod. A miserable sod is a curmudgeonly, misanthropic, tight-fisted person. Generally speaking, it is not considered to be a complimentary term. However, I feel that this is due to a misunderstanding - I am sure that the vast number of people who apply it to me must prove that it is, in fact, complimentary. If you disagree with that opinion, you are an uneducated, ignorant peasant.

  4. #4
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    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: miserable sod

    So nice of Fivejedjon to take time out from chasing small children out of his front garden and calling the police whenever his neighbors flush the toilet too loudly to post an answer to this question.

  5. #5
    maiabulela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: miserable sod

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I assume that the semi-colon should be a comma, and that it is Grant who is the miserable sod. A miserable sod is a curmudgeonly, misanthropic, tight-fisted person. Generally speaking, it is not considered to be a complimentary term. However, I feel that this is due to a misunderstanding - I am sure that the vast number of people who apply it to me must prove that it is, in fact, complimentary. If you disagree with that opinion, you are an uneducated, ignorant peasant.
    I couldn't get the rest of what you have said

  6. #6
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: miserable sod

    What is the meaning of "miserable sod"?


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) The posters have explained what it means nowadays.

    (2) But shouldn't learners know its origin? That "sod" is

    short for "sodomite," i.e., a gay person (the term we use

    today). Back in those days, it was assumed that a sodomite

    led a miserable life. I have read that in England some people would

    often assume that older gay men would commit suicide.

    (3) I apologize for injecting a somber note into what was a

    delightful and lighthearted exchange. I will understand it if a

    moderator decides to delete my post, but I feel that we have a

    duty to alert learners to potentially dangerous terms that should be

    avoided until they become fluent. I believe that some learners of

    certain cultures would never use this term if they knew its historical

    background.



    James

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    Default Re: miserable sod

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ... shouldn't learners know its origin? That "sod" is short for "sodomite," i.e., a gay person (the term we use today). [...]

    I apologize for injecting a somber note into what was a delightful and lighthearted exchange. I will understand it if a moderator decides to delete my post, but I feel that we have a duty to alert learners to potentially dangerous terms that should be avoided until they become fluent. I believe that some learners of certain cultures would never use this term if they knew its historical background.
    If we worried about what words originally meant, we would not dare open our mouths; glamour and grammar are, etymologically, variants of the same word. It is possible that quaint comes from the same root as c**t.

    I would agree with TheParser if he were saying that learners should avoid using slang, and possibly offensive, words unless they are sure of how native speakers use them. However, learners should not worry unduly about the historical background of words. Many native speakers use, informally, with friends, such words as sod and bugger with little idea of the historical background of the words.

    To most native speakers (of BrE at least), sod has no more connection with sodomite than nice has with fine, subtle,

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