Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Lisa.Usven is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Venezuela
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Drunk vs drunken

    As a foreigner, I always get quite confused when I read/hear the expression "drunken driver" because I understood expressions like these call for the past participle of a verb; i.e. “missed appointment”, “closed case”, etc. If I recall correctly the past participle of "to drink" is "drunk". I don't see the word drunken as a proper conjugation on the list of verbs I was given to memorize when I was learning English. If I were to guess, I would say that “drunken” is being used erroneously but before making any right or wrong assumptions, I would like to know the opinion of an English teacher/expert in this matter.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,815
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Drunk vs drunken

    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa.Usven View Post
    As a foreigner, I always get quite confused when I read/hear the expression "drunken driver" because I understood expressions like these call for the past participle of a verb; i.e. “missed appointment”, “closed case”, etc. If I recall correctly the past participle of "to drink" is "drunk". I don't see the word drunken as a proper conjugation on the list of verbs I was given to memorize when I was learning English. If I were to guess, I would say that “drunken” is being used erroneously but before making any right or wrong assumptions, I would like to know the opinion of an English teacher/expert in this matter.
    Have a look here: Definition of drunken adjective from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

  3. #3
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,141
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Drunk vs drunken

    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa.Usven View Post
    As a foreigner, I always get quite confused when I read/hear the expression "drunken driver" because I understood expressions like these call for the past participle of a verb; i.e. “missed appointment”, “closed case”, etc. If I recall correctly the past participle of "to drink" is "drunk". I don't see the word drunken as a proper conjugation on the list of verbs I was given to memorize when I was learning English. If I were to guess, I would say that “drunken” is being used erroneously but before making any right or wrong assumptions, I would like to know the opinion of an English teacher/expert in this matter.

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) Here in the United States, the media (newspapers, TV stations, etc.) usually refer

    to the crime of "drunk driving" and to the people as "drunk drivers."

    (2) I notice that our British friends refer to the crime as "drink driving." I do not

    know how they refer to the drivers.

  4. #4
    suprunp's Avatar
    suprunp is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    526
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Drunk vs drunken

    NOT A TEACHER

    New Oxford American Dictionary, 2nd Edition.

    Anyone who is obviously or legally under the influence of
    alcohol is said to be drunk.
    Drunken means the same thing, but only drunk should be
    used predicatively - that is, after a linking verb (she was drunk) -
    while drunken is more often used to modify a noun (a drunken sailor) and,
    in some cases, to imply habitual drinking to excess. Drunken is also used
    to modify nouns that do not refer to a person (a drunken celebration).

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,665
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Drunk vs drunken

    You'll find signs of these pairs of past participles in various other cases; 'proved'/'proven' say. 'Proven' is chiefly used attributively: 'a proven case/treatment/success...'. The two forms existed, and usage has tended to favour the one in a certain position.

    In old texts you'll find these 'en' participles used predicatively. The Christmas Carol Ding dong merrily on high says 'Let steeple bells be swungen. And IO-IO-IO by priest and people [U]sungen[/U']. The words 'swungen' and 'sungen' no longer exist.

    b

    PS In regional dialects, these extra participles persist. I had a friend who used to talk about a 'boughten cake' (rather than a home-made one).
    PPS I've just posted a (totally unrelated, but maybe interesting) teaching resource on a different sort of '-en' verb at http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resour...tives-6094016/
    Last edited by BobK; 05-Jul-2011 at 12:10. Reason: PSs Added

  6. #6
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    15,270
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Drunk vs drunken

    Welcome to the forum, Lisa.

    You could also look at the Similar Threads at the bottom of the page.

    Rover

Similar Threads

  1. got drunk
    By Ju in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-Dec-2010, 18:51
  2. [Grammar] must have drunk?
    By nado92 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 18-May-2010, 18:02
  3. When somebody is almost drunk
    By Stromgol in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 26-Jun-2008, 23:18
  4. drunk/drunken
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-Oct-2007, 14:06
  5. drunk & drunken
    By bellentsai in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 29-Nov-2005, 13:12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •