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  1. #1
    Nordic Bill is offline Member
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    Default 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    I am debating with myself whether or not to use "into" or "in to" in these two sentences:

    (re: a soap opera, action series):
    They end each episode with exciting scenes from the upcoming episode to get you to tune in to/into it.

    (re: reprimands on the workplace):
    He was called in to / into the bossí office for a tongue-lashing.

    Thanks,
    Bill

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    I think you could use both in these examples. With the first, I would be tempted to use two words, as it's 'tune in' + to, though 'into' would be fine. With the second, I think it could depend on context. If the person were in the office already, then I'd probably use 'into', but if he were rung up and told to come in, then I'd probably use two words.

  3. #3
    Gilbert is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    To tune in to something... Very interesting. What the pronunciation then? I'd say the stress is on "in" (as in to put up, come on etc.). Although it is not against the rules (stressed syllable - at least one unstressed syllable - stressed syllable...), it sounds a bit unnatural.

  4. #4
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    Wink Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordic Bill
    I am debating with myself whether or not to use "into" or "in to" in these two sentences:

    (re: a soap opera, action series):
    They end each episode with exciting scenes from the upcoming episode to get you to tune in to/into it.
    [/B]
    .....
    Thanks,
    Bill
    Would it be OK to end the above sentence with "tune in"
    instead? Or is it incorrect because the sentence would
    end on a preposition?

    Thanks

    ---
    "Turn on, tune in, drop out." - Timothy Leary ;)
    Detailed quote below:
    "Six words: drop out, turn on, then come back and tune it in... and then drop out again, and turn on, and tune it back in... it's a rhythm... most of us think God made this universe in nature-subject object-predicate sentences... turn on, tune in, drop out... period, end of paragraph. Turn the page... it's all a rhythm... it's all a beat. You turn on, you find it inside, and then you have to come back (since you can't stay high all the time) and you have to build a better model. But don't get caught - don't get hooked - don't get attracted by the thing you're building, cause... you gotta drop out again. It's a cycle. Turn on, tune in, drop out. Keep it going, keep it going... the nervous system works that way... gotta keep it flowing, keep it flowing..." - Timothy Leary

  5. #5
    Nordic Bill is offline Member
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    Default Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    Hi Gilbert - yes, the stress definitely falls on the word "in" here.

  6. #6
    Nordic Bill is offline Member
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    Default Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    Hey there, tdol,

    Thanks for the feedback on that one. It is indeed a toughie to pinpoint at times, especially when you have to take the time to think what the emphasis is placed on, which ultimately leads to a split or compound form. I would also assume the same ruling applies to "on to" and "onto", etc.

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    It is tricky- I think I could easily give a different answer tomorrow.

  8. #8
    Nordic Bill is offline Member
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    Default Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    Thanks, tdol, and you're most welcome to send me another reply tomorrow!

    This little problem sure does leave you thinking. Even a sentence such as "I heard a car pull in to / into the driveway" that sounds so simple in spoken English can have me pulling my hair out when attemtping to put it in to/into writing!

  9. #9
    Nordic Bill is offline Member
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    Default Re: 'Into' and 'In to' in certain idioms and expressions

    Oops, scratch that driveway one. I had that one figured out just after I hit SEND! LOL!

    But it does serve to illustrate the use of these split forms, as I came up with a couple of examples here - both relating to driving - which make it a little clearer:

    A car pulled into the driveway.
    A car pulled in to the curb.


    Into is used in the first example, since a driveway can "contain" a vehicle, hence it goes into it. The second example indicates a place by (not in) which a car can be parked, so in in this case indicates movement in the direction of the curb and is separate from the preposition to.

    Bill

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