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Thread: B.j.

  1. #1
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    Question B.j.

    When is W considered a vowel? Example please.

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    Mister Micawber's Avatar
    Mister Micawber is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: B.j.

    .
    Remember that 'vowel' and 'consonant' primarily refer to sounds, and not the letters sometimes used to represent them.

    Awesome

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    Default Re: B.j.

    D*mn that's not what I expected in this thread.

    FRC

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    Gilbert is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: B.j.

    Quote Originally Posted by B.J.
    When is W considered a vowel? Example please.
    I've never heard of that! W a the sound you make saying "yield" are called approximants (or glides), they both have a lot of common with vowels (considering sonority), except for the fact that they can't constitute a syllable.

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: B.j.

    It used to be considered a vowel, I believe; it's derivation is from doubling a vowel, but I don't see it called a vowel anymore.

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    Gilbert is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: B.j.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It used to be considered a vowel, I believe; it's derivation is from doubling a vowel, but I don't see it called a vowel anymore.
    Did it? It is the non-syllabicity that avoid w being a vowel, as far as I can tell (and this rule applies not only to English).

    What is doubling a vowel anyway?

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: B.j.

    A long time ago, but it was double-u and written 'uu', wasn't it? In not forming a syllable the only definition? I thought it had to do with airflow.

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    Gilbert is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: B.j.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    A long time ago, but it was double-u and written 'uu', wasn't it? In not forming a syllable the only definition? I thought it had to do with airflow.
    Yes, non-syllabicity is the only feature to differ glides from vowels.

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: B.j.

    Sorry, Gilbert- I was getting your definition confused.

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