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    #1

    Clutch and Break

    Hi, everyone,

    Recently, I read a driving manual and found the following instruction:
    Stopping the Car
    Disengage the clutch and break. You do not have to let go of the clutch at stop signs. Just make sure you change it back to first gear before you go.

    In that, I would like to know if the "break" is a synonym of "brake".
    Thanks in advance for helping me to clarify this.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Clutch and Break

    It's supposed to be "brake." The person who typed it made a mistake.

    I have to say, I can drive a manual (with a clutch) car, and I would have no idea what this was telling me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Clutch and Break

    I got it from here. And the term occurs in several times.

    Learn how to drive a manual transmission or stick shift | Learn-To-Drive-Stick-Shift.com

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    #4

    Re: Clutch and Break

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It's supposed to be "brake." The person who typed it made a mistake.

    I have to say, I can drive a manual (with a clutch) car, and I would have no idea what this was telling me.
    I think he is saying that when you come to a stop (like at a stop sign), you can push in the clutch, put the car into neutral, let the clutch out and brake to a stop. Then you push the clutch in, put it in gear and go.

    He is saying you can just push the clutch in, keep holding it in while you brake to a stop, then move the gear to first and then continue on. That holding the clutch fully in is the equivalent of shifting to neutral.

    I do this sometimes, especially at stop signs where you aren't really stopping to wait for traffic, you are just genuflecting to the idea of traffic control.

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    #5

    Re: Clutch and Break

    Wow. I never shifted into neutral at a stop sign or light. I just left the clutch in with the other foot on the brake, and shifted to 1st. Do you really habitutally shift into neutral at longer stops?

    (I haven't had a manual since my beloved CRX had to go because it had no room for the child seat -- and that child is about to enter high school.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: Clutch and Break

    Yeah. It's a pain to be holding a clutch in for minutes waiting at a light.

    There is an argument for marginal safety to be holding the clutch in, as you say. If someone were to crash into you (or if you passed out), your foot would come off the clutch and your car would stall instead of rolling freely.

    That said, most people drive automatics. If someone hits into them and their feet come off the pedal, their cars will roll.

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    #7

    Re: Clutch and Break

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post

    There is an argument for marginal safety to be holding the clutch in, as you say. If someone were to crash into you (or if you passed out), your foot would come off the clutch and your car would stall instead of rolling freely.
    There is another possibility. If you passed out or, what is more likely to happen, became thoughtful about numerous life's problems, and your foot would come off the clutch your car would "take a jump" a couple of meters into a car standing before at best, on zebra crossing crowded with pedestrians at worst.

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    #8

    Re: Clutch and Break

    I've never known a car to go a couple meters when you pop the clutch. A giant jerk that goes a couple feet. Not meters.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: Clutch and Break

    Wouldn't a couple of feet be enough to get you into unnecessary trouble?
    I was taught to shift into neutral at a stop sign or light. Where I come from it is widely thought, reasonably enough, to be the right way of driving.

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    #10

    Re: Clutch and Break

    Quote Originally Posted by suprunp View Post
    Wouldn't a couple of feet be enough to get you into unnecessary trouble?
    I was taught to shift into neutral at a stop sign or light. Where I come from it is widely thought, reasonably enough, to be the right way of driving.
    You bring up good points. We also have to factor in whether your car is sitting on a hill or not.

    I will go back to my original thought: It's an effort to hold the clutch in. Much easier to shift to neutral.

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