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Thread: undercut

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    #1

    undercut

    "You can't take these two pills at a time. Since the new drug you've been prescribed is going to undercut the effect of the drug you've been taking already, you're supposed to take them on a two-hour gap/period??"(there should be two hours between the intake of the drugs)?

    Would this sentence be grammatically correct? What about the use of the verb "undercut"?
    Last edited by ostap77; 18-Jul-2011 at 23:01.

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    #2

    Re: undercut

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "You can't take these two drugs at a time. Since the new drug you've been prescribed is going to undercut the effetc of the one you've been taking already, you're supposed to take them on a two-hour gap"(there should be two hours between the intake of the drugs)?

    Would this sentence be grammatically correct? What about the use of the verb "undercut"?
    It depends on what the actual effect will be. If it stops the first drug working, then I would say "inhibit". If it makes the effect less, I would say "lessen" or possibly "minimise" if it left it at a very low level.

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    #3

    Re: undercut

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It depends on what the actual effect will be. If it stops the first drug working, then I would say "inhibit". If it makes the effect less, I would say "lessen" or possibly "minimise" if it left it at a very low level.
    "undercut" would be the wrong verb for making the effect less? Is it just the wrong context to us it in? Is it "on a two-hour gap or period"?

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    #4

    Re: undercut

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "You can't take these two pills at a time. Since the new drug you've been prescribed is going to undercut the effect of the drug you've been taking already, you're supposed to take them on a two-hour gap/period??"(there should be two hours between the intake of the drugs)?

    Would this sentence be grammatically correct? What about the use of the verb "undercut"?
    Do not take these two pills at the same time. The new drug you've been prescribed will inhibit/lessen/minimise the effects of the drug you're already taking. You should take the two pills two hours apart / You should leave two hours between taking the two different pills.

    "Undercut" is usually used in connection with money, when one company or individual charges a lower price than another in order to gain business.

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