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  1. #1
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    after you've lived change to after you've been living?

    "Let's see what you're going to say after you've been living in Germany for 3 years."

    The present perfect is used after "until", "till" or "after". Would it be possible to you use the present perfect progressive instead of the present perfect as in the sentence above?

    How about using it after until?

    "You're not entitiled to have any financial benefits until you have been working here for half a year."
    Last edited by ostap77; 24-Jul-2011 at 17:33.

  2. #2
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    Re: after you've lived change to after you've been living?

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "Let's see what you're going to say after you've been living in Germany for 3 years."

    The present perfect is used after "until", "till" or "after". Would it be possible to you use the present perfect progressive instead of the present perfect as in the sentence above?

    The present perfect progressive is fine in the second half of the sentence but I would have used the simple present at the beginning:

    Let's see what you say after you've been living in Germany for 3 years.
    Let's see what you say once you've been living in Germany for 3 years.


    How about using it after untill until?

    "You're not entitiled to have any financial benefits untill until you have been working here for half a year."

    That's fine, but note the spelling of "until".

    You don't really need "have" in the first part of the sentence. "You're not entitled to any financial benefits..."
    If you really want to put a verb there, then I would suggest "You're not entitled to receive any financial benefits..."

    See above.

  3. #3
    ostap77 is offline Key Member
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    Re: after you've lived change to after you've been living?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    See above.
    "You will be entitiled to financial benefits when you've been working here for half a year."Ok?

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: after you've lived change to after you've been living?

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "You will be entitiled to financial benefits when you've been working here for half a year." Is that OK?
    That's OK although "half a year" isn't normally used.

    You'll be entitled to financial benefits when (or once) you've been working here for six months.

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