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Thread: Dec. 2011

  1. rainous's Avatar
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    #1

    Dec. 2011

    Is it acceptable in formal writing to write just an abbreviated form of month and then year,
    as in "Dec. 2011"?

    thanks

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    #2

    Re: Dec. 2011

    Is there a pressing need?

  2. rainous's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Dec. 2011

    No.

    It's more like self-imposed pressing needs.

    I was writing an employment reference letter and wondering if there was a proper way to write periods without including date since there is no need to be that specific?

    For example, I want to write something like "Dec. 2010 ~ Jun. 2011" but is it acceptable?

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Dec. 2011

    If it's in a table or list it may be acceptable,but not in a sentence.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Dec. 2011

    Quote Originally Posted by rainous View Post
    No.

    It's more like self-imposed pressing needs.

    I was writing an employment reference letter and wondering if there was a proper way to write periods without including date since there is no need to be that specific?

    For example, I want to write something like "Dec. 2010 ~ Jun. 2011" but is it acceptable?
    I personally wouldn't have a problem with it, but use a hyphen ( - ) to mean 'to', not a tilde ( ~ ).
    Some people associate the tilde with approximation, so your phrase might read "from December 2010 to about June 2011".

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Dec. 2011

    Good point. I expect this is something to do with the mathematical symbol for 'is approximately equal to': ≈ (I think, but I'm not a mathematician).

    b

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Dec. 2011

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Good point. I expect this is something to do with the mathematical symbol for 'is approximately equal to': ≈ (I think, but I'm not a mathematician).

    b
    Nor am I, but when I was in med. school, all our professors used it for non-mathematical shorthand to mean "about".
    "PR ~ 72" (Pulse rate around 72 beats/min), etc.
    "Laceration on L arm ~ 3cm long."

    (I don't count guessing approximate measurements as mathematics.)

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Dec. 2011

    Quote Originally Posted by rainous View Post
    No.

    It's more like self-imposed pressing needs.

    I was writing an employment reference letter and wondering if there was a proper way to write periods without including date since there is no need to be that specific?

    For example, I want to write something like "Dec. 2010 ~ Jun. 2011" but is it acceptable?
    In any sort of running prose (not a table), I suggest you write December 2010 to June 2011. For an employment reference letter, which is on the formal side of the spectrum, I advise it even more strongly.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: Dec. 2011

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Nor am I, but when I was in med. school, all our professors used it for non-mathematical shorthand to mean "about".
    "PR ~ 72" (Pulse rate around 72 beats/min), etc.
    "Laceration on L arm ~ 3cm long."

    (I don't count guessing approximate measurements as mathematics.)
    Yes, this is the difference. "~" means approximately. "≈" means is approximately equal.

    1.99 ≈ 2
    ~10cm of tape.

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Dec. 2011

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Yes, this is the difference. "~" means approximately. "≈" means is approximately equal.

    1.99 ≈ 2
    ~10cm of tape.
    I was guessing at a derivation to explain the 'approximate' use of the tilde (perhaps by people who weren't aware of the background). I didn't know the single-tilde had that technical meaning (which presumably explains the double-tilde symbol). ;(But, in terms of derivation, one of them must have come first - unless they were simultaneously and/or independently coined (all of which suppositions strike me as unlikely )

    b

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