Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    donnach is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    126
    Post Thanks / Like

    The 'past participle' skilled

    Was skill ever a verb? If not, skilled is not a past participle adjective. If not a past participle adjective, what is it?

    Can nouns be made into adjectives by adding -ed?

    What about experience? Experienced derives more from the noun than the verb sense.

    Are there other words (nouns) that function as past participles of ghost verbs?

    Thanks!

    Donna

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,927
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: The 'past participle' skilled

    Oxford give it as a verb, though usually used in the skilling form:
    definition of skill from Oxford Dictionaries Online

    And de-skilling is used. I can't recall coming across things like They skilled us.

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    20,121
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: The 'past participle' skilled

    I don't think that all these adjectives ending in '-ed' are necessarily past participles, or derived from verbs.
    "You are talented. Someone has talented you." (?)
    "People who aren't blind are sighted. They have been sighted." (?)
    "He is prejudiced. Who prejudiced him?" (?)
    ...

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: The 'past participle' skilled

    A few past participles actually have an active meaning when used as adjectives.

    a fallen leaf
    advanced students
    an escaped prisoner
    the collapsed hotel
    a retired general
    the curtains are faded
    I'll be finished in a few minutes

    The examples are from Swan's Practical English Usage, 3rd edition, page 380.

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,759
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: The 'past participle' skilled

    Quote Originally Posted by donnach View Post
    ...
    Can nouns be made into adjectives by adding -ed?

    -...
    Almost any noun can be verbed, and often is - especially in the world of business. After being verbed, they can undergo other transformations: with skill (n) you can have skill (v), whence skilling, skilled, upskill, downskill, reskill, deskill...

    However, as Ray said, an '-ed' ending doesn't always mean 'past participle'. It seems to me that there are two sorts of 'skilled' out there, one meaning 'having skill' and a more modern one meaning 'given a skill'.

    b

  6. #6
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,098
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: The 'past participle' skilled

    The suffix "-ed" can be used to form adjectives directly from nouns, as others have said. Its meaning is similar to that of "-ful" and opposite to that of "-less". "-less" can often be replaced with "un- -ed".

    We have the following. (I'm not taking all meanings of these words into account and some of these words are archaic or obsolete.)

    sightless = unsighted
    voiceless = unvoiced
    pointless = unpointed
    skill-less, skilless = unskilled
    wontless = unwonted

    Longer words only seem to take "un- -ed". We only have "unconcerned" and "unprincipled". "Concernless" and "principleless" aren't words.

    It's interesting that the pattern of adding the past participle ending directly to nouns can be found also in Latin.

Similar Threads

  1. past participle and present participle
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Feb-2009, 20:01
  2. [Grammar] Compound Nouns, present participle, past participle, adjective.
    By Lthanh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Oct-2008, 17:03
  3. past participle or present participle
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-May-2008, 21:06
  4. present participle and past participle
    By rensi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Apr-2008, 09:23
  5. present participle and past participle
    By dusrn11 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Jun-2005, 10:44

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •