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  1. #11
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: pronounciation of ending sound

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I mean that the spelling and pronunciation of many words in English don't follow any rules. When you learn Italian, it's easy. In Italian, "sci" is always pronounced /ʃi/. When you see "sci" in an Italian word, you can safely pronounce it /ʃi/ and it will be correct. You don't need do know this word, because this rule (that "sci" is always pronounced /ʃi/) applies to all Italian words. When you learn Italian pronunciation, it's enough to learn some simple rules and you can read any word you encounter.

    This is not true regarding English. Simple rules don't work for English because there are very many exceptions. You have to learn these exceptions one by one because there isn't any simple rule that would tell you how to handle them. Learning English pronunciation is much more difficult than learning Italian pronunciation because of this.

    Someone told you that there are no silent final letters in English except "e". It's a simple rule. It would be great if it were correct because it would make reading easier. Unfortunately, this rule isn't correct. Many English words have silent final letters. It's true that most English words don't have them, but still there are many which do. You have to learn which.
    Hi birdeen's call

    You are the kindest person I have ever seen! You taught me a lot for the English pronounciation which I have been confused for many years.

    Based on my own judgement, I divide the words with ending sound or no ending sound as follows: -

    1. No ending sound: a,c,e,h,i, j,o,q,r,u,v,w,y
    2. With ending sound: b (except mb),d,f,g,k,l,m,n,p,s,t,x

    Am I correct in most cases? I understand that there are some exceptions.
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 04-Aug-2011 at 19:39.

  2. #12
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: pronounciation of ending sound

    Quote Originally Posted by bh1234 View Post
    Hi birdeen's call

    You are the kindest person I have ever seen! You taught me a lot for the English pronounciation which I have been confused for many years.
    This is very flattering. Thank you.

    Based on our own judgement, if I divide the words with ending sound or no ending sound as follows: -

    1. No ending sound: a,c,e,h,i, j,o,q,u,v,w,y
    2. With ending sound: b (except mb),d,f,g,k,l,m,n,p,r,s,t,x


    Am I correct in most cases? I understand that there are some exceptions.
    It's difficult for me to answer this question. I'm not sure I understand it correctly. Do you mean that words that end in one of these letters:

    a, c, e, h, i, j,o, q, u, v, w, y

    usually have them silent?

    Let's see. These letters are quite rarely the final letters of words (except "c", "e" and "y") in English. Let's take a look at "a", "c", "e" and "h".

    a
    The simplest word that ends in "a" is simply "a" -- the article. Of course, the letter "a" isn't silent here. Otherwise the whole word would be silent! It's pronounced /ə/ or /eɪ/.
    The word "fora" ends in "a". It's pronounced /fɔːrə/. The letter "a" isn't silent. It's pronounced /ə/.

    The word "visa" ends in "a". It's pronouced /viːzə/. The letter "a" isn't silent. It's pronounced /ə/.

    I can't find any word in which "a" would be the final letter and it would be silent. But it doesn't mean such a word doesn't exist.
    c
    Most words that end in "c" are these with the suffix "-ic". For example, "basic", "forensic", "economic". "c" is not silent in these (unless there are exceptions that I don't know). It's pronounced /k/.

    There are some other words in English that end in "c". For example, "franc". This word is pronounced /fræŋk/, so "c" isn't silent. It's pronounced /k/. Some people will pronounce "franc" in the French way, that is /frɑ̃/. "c" is silent in this prononciation, but it's a rare pronunciation.

    I think we can safely say that "c" is very rarely silent when it's the final letter of a word.
    e
    Many English words end in "e" and it's very often silent then. We have "come" (/kʌm/), "some" (/sʌm/), "home" (/həʊm/) and "borne" (/bɔːn/). "e" is silent in all of these.

    When a word ends in double "e", the double "e" is usually pronounced /i:/. We have "employee", "donee", "coffee"

    Some words ending in "e" came to English directly from French. Some of these are often written with original French accents. For example, "née" (/niː/ or /neɪ/), "fiancé" (/fɪˈɒnseɪ/), "café" (/kæfeɪ/). As you see "e", "ée" and "é" aren't silent here.

    The word "technique" comes directly from French, but "e" is silent here. The word is pronounced /tɛkˈniːk/.

    It's impossible to discuss all possibilities here. As you can see it's extremely complicated.
    h
    Most words in English that end in "h" are those which end in "ch", "sh", "tch", "gh" and "sch". It doesn't make sense to discuss whether "h" is silent in these words or not. These are so called digraphs and trigraphs. It doesn't make sense to consider every letter separately in these strings.
    Few other words in English end in "h". For example, "rajah" is pronounced /rɑːdʒə/. "h" is silent in this word.
    You can see that this is very complicated. If you create simple rules for yourself, you will be confused when you encounter exceptions. English is a mix of three main languages with many additions from numerous others. Different rules from different languages mixed together and there has never been anyone who would regulate it. This is why English is so irregular.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 04-Aug-2011 at 20:25.

  3. #13
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: pronounciation of ending sound

    [QUOTE=birdeen's call;784879]This is very flattering. Thank you.


    Yes, you are right! I made some wrong pronunciation rules for myself.!
    1." a" e.g media{miːdiə) That means "a" is sounded
    2 "c" e.g basic The ending letter "c" is pronounced /k/
    3. "e" for employee. The ending letter "e" is pronounced /i/
    4. " Few other words in English end in "h"" except gh etc-totally agreed


    Thank you very much again! God bless you!


    Best regards,
    bh

  4. #14
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: pronounciation of ending sound

    Quote Originally Posted by bh1234 View Post
    Hi Bobk/birdeencall’s call,

    Many Thx to you.

    Do you mean that we need not pronounce the ending sound? "For example 'head' without 'd' sound, 'soap" without 'p' sound and 'heart' without 't' sound".The ending sound can be silent for 'head' & soap"?
    As BC said , absolutely not. Read my earlier post. Sorry - my battery's dyin...

    b

  5. #15
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: pronounciation of ending sound

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    As BC said , absolutely not. Read my earlier post. Sorry - my battery's dyin...

    b
    I regret that I could not find your earlier post. Sorry - my battery's dyin... in UE
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 05-Aug-2011 at 08:52.

  6. #16
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: pronounciation of ending sound

    Quote Originally Posted by bh1234 View Post
    I regret that I could not find your earlier post. Sorry - my battery's dyin... in UE
    Sorry the 'dyin...' bit was a rather (OK very ) weak joke. By 'my earlier post' I meant http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/pr...tml#post784694 .

    I think BC and I are talking about different things. She seems to be talking about written letters. I'm talking about phonemes - which (particularly /p t k b d g/) Chinese speakers frequently omit at the ends of words.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 05-Aug-2011 at 11:44. Reason: Added paren.

  7. #17
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: pronounciation of ending sound

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Sorry the 'dyin...' bit was a rather (OK very ) weak joke. By 'my earlier post' I meant http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/pr...tml#post784694 .

    I think BC and I are talking about different things. She seems to be talking about written letters. I'm talking about phonemes - which Chinese speakers frequently omit at the ends of words.

    b
    Yes, I was trying to show the OP some of the oddities of the English spelling system. The OP seems to be trying to understand what relation between letters and sounds there is in English.

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