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  1. #11
    Hedwig's Avatar
    Hedwig is offline Senior Member
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    Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Vidor View Post
    Does anyone call them different dialects? I'd think the word "dialect" implies greater differences in grammar and mutual comprehension than anything that exists between British and American. I say "have a try" or simply "try" instead of "have a go", I say "shut up" instead of "shut it", but if I read someone in a Harry Potter book use the second option I have no trouble understanding.
    I agree. Someone in a previous post, I think it was Ziggy, mentioned "American dialect" and I was addressing that thought.

  2. #12
    Vidor is offline Member
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    not a teacher

    Of course, 30 years ago when I was a grade-school kid reading Agatha Christie mysteries, I was completely at a loss with "fortnight".

  3. #13
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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: British and American grammar

    One of the differences shows up in a few prepositions.

    In/on the street, at/on the weekends.

    The differnces are pretty minor.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. #14
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Vidor View Post
    Does anyone call them different dialects? I'd think the word "dialect" implies greater differences in grammar and mutual comprehension than anything that exists between British and American. I say "have a try" or simply "try" instead of "have a go", I say "shut up" instead of "shut it", but if I read someone in a Harry Potter book use the second option I have no trouble understanding.
    American English and British English are different sets of dialects rather than different dialects in my opinion.

  5. #15
    gwright2803 is offline Newbie
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    Re: British and American grammar

    The language isn't called the "English" language for no reason! The only correct version is the English used in ENGLAND. Therefore. As England is part of Britain. The only correct version is british English.
    American English is often referred to as "stupidize" by TEFL tutors in Europe anyway. And many people in Europe that use American English in an English exam will certainly FAIL !

  6. #16
    5jj's Avatar
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    Re: British and American grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by gwright2803 View Post
    The language isn't called the "English" language for no reason! The only correct version is the English used in ENGLAND. And which of the many dialects in England would that one be?
    Therefore. As England is part of Britain. The only correct version is bBritish English. You may not have noticed, but Scotland and Wales are also parts of Great Britain.
    American English is often referred to as "stupidize" by TEFL tutors in Europe anyway. NO serious English teacher would dream of making such a fatuous reference. And many people in Europe that use American English in an English exam will certainly FAIL ! No, they will not.
    Ignorance and prejudice have no place in this forum. Try checking your facts before you make comments on something about which you appear to know little or nothing.

  7. #17
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: British and American grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by gwright2803 View Post
    The language isn't called the "English" language for no reason! The only correct version is the English used in ENGLAND. Therefore. As England is part of Britain. The only correct version is british English.
    I can't see how British English is somehow more correct that American English in America, or Australian English in Australia, etc, etc. There are many correct versions of English- one of the beauties of the language is its ability to adapt to new environments without losing its core comprehensibility.


    Quote Originally Posted by gwright2803 View Post
    American English is often referred to as "stupidize" by TEFL tutors in Europe anyway.
    I have taught in a number of countries and never heard this.

    Quote Originally Posted by gwright2803 View Post
    And many people in Europe that use American English in an English exam will certainly FAIL !
    This is factually wrong in the case of the most important exam suites like the Cambridge ESOL ones. They say that, for instance, both spelling systems are fine as long as they are used consistently. It's simply not true to say that an excellent piece of writing would fail in Europe if someone wrote color.

    Also, please note that much of your post is insulting and goes against the terms and spirit of the forum. Here all variants of English are respected and regarded as equal. If you find that offensive, then please look for a British-English-Is-Best forum. Our approach is international to reflect the nature of the English language.

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