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Thread: burn up

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    #1

    burn up

    Can w e say :" He burned up for my rudeniss.," according to a dictionary explanation to the phrase "become or make angry" ? But I haven;t found any examples like this .
    Thanks a lot!

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    #2

    Re: burn up

    "He got fired up because of my rudeness."

    is the way I would say that. "Burned", though, can mean injured or insulted.

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    #3

    Re: burn up

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    Can w e say :" He burned up for my rudeniss.," according to a dictionary explanation to the phrase "become or make angry" ? But I haven;t found any examples like this .
    Thanks a lot!
    "Burned up" is a common expression in AmE and means as your dictionary states. So, to use the phrase as in your post you should prefix the phrase with "got" i.e. "got burned up".

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    #4

    Re: burn up

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    "Burned up" is a common expression in AmE and means as your dictionary states. So, to use the phrase as in your post you should prefix the phrase with "got" i.e. "got burned up".
    1). Just as you and Frank Antonson said ,before burned should add got, my trouble is about the dictionary's explanation. It says "become angry", in essence, become is an intransitive verb, we can use it intransitively, for example, "The sun rises.", so I said "He burned up..." Is my inference right?
    2). " fire ,v.i. ... fire up : (a) to start a fire in a furnace,stove, etc; (b) to become irritated or angry," The above is quoted from a Webster's Dictionary. About (a,b) ,I would like you to give me each an example, in which fire should be an intransitive verb. If you couldn't do, can it indicate the dictionary is wrong here?
    Thank you both!

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    #5

    Re: burn up

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    1). Just as you and Frank Antonson said ,before burned should add got, my trouble is about the dictionary's explanation. It says "become angry", in essence, become is an intransitive verb, we can use it intransitively, for example, "The sun rises.", so I said "He burned up..." Is my inference right?

    No, if you say "he burned up", the listener would think that the person was literally on fire. With "he got burned up", "burned up" is actually a phrasal verb, but used as an adjective, just as in "He applied for the job, but got turned down."

    2). " fire ,v.i. ... fire up : (a) to start a fire in a furnace,stove, etc; (b) to become irritated or angry," OR (c) to become excited or enthusiastic The above is quoted from a Webster's Dictionary. About (a,b) ,I would like you to give me each an example, in which fire should be an intransitive verb. If you couldn't do, can it indicate the dictionary is wrong here? He fired up (phrasal verb as a verb) the furnace./He got fired up about the speech (phrasal verb as an adjective).

    Thank you both!
    See above. As in the expression "don't mix apples and oranges", don't mix the roles of certain parts of speech. Just as gerunds look like verbs but act like nouns.
    Last edited by billmcd; 08-Aug-2011 at 21:03.

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    #6

    Re: burn up

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    See above. As in the expression "don't mix apples and oranges", don't mix the roles of certain parts of speech. Just as gerunds look like verbs but act like nouns.
    I enjoy your detailed explanation. But please read:
    "fire up 1.start a fire in a furnace (vt) ; I fired the furnace with firwood last winter.
    2. become suddenly angry (vi) ; She fires up a lot; she's a short tempered woman."
    The above I quoted from a Chinese book. Which ,either the Chinese book or the Webster's, is right?
    Thank you very much!

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    #7

    Re: burn up

    You may be interested to know that the Oxford English Dictionary gives two quotations from the 19th century illustrating the use of "fire up" as an intransitive verb:

    If I were to hear any body speak slightingly of you, I should fire up in a moment. (Jane Austen)

    and

    She fired up at the arrogance of the squire. (W Irving)

    I have not come across this usage in more modern (British) English but I don't know about American usage.

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    #8

    Re: burn up

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Jugg View Post
    You may be interested to know that the Oxford English Dictionary gives two quotations from the 19th century illustrating the use of "fire up" as an intransitive verb:

    If I were to hear any body speak slightingly of you, I should fire up in a moment. (Jane Austen)

    and

    She fired up at the arrogance of the squire. (W Irving)

    I have not come across this usage in more modern (British) English but I don't know about American usage.
    Yes. You would seldom, if ever, hear the expression used that way in AmE. But it is more likely to read it in a novel.

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    #9

    Re: burn up

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    I enjoy your detailed explanation. But please read:
    "fire up 1.start a fire in a furnace (vt) ; I fired the furnace with firwood last winter.
    2. become suddenly angry (vi) ; She fires up a lot; she's a short tempered woman."
    The above I quoted from a Chinese book. Which ,either the Chinese book or the Webster's, is right?
    Thank you very much!
    Please see Curt Jugg's post and my addendum to his post. With all due respect to the authors of the Chinese book, in AmE you would seldom/never hear that a person "fires up". Rather, "gets fired up" is a more common expression in AmE. And perhaps to make it more confusing, to get fired up has yet another more common meaning in AmE. It means to become energetic or enthusiastic. For example, "Everyone is fired up about the new advertising campaign." OR "The coach told his team to get fired up for the big game next week."

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    #10

    Re: burn up

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Jugg View Post
    You may be interested to know that the Oxford English Dictionary gives two quotations from the 19th century illustrating the use of "fire up" as an intransitive verb:

    If I were to hear any body speak slightingly of you, I should fire up in a moment. (Jane Austen)

    and

    She fired up at the arrogance of the squire. (W Irving)

    I have not come across this usage in more modern (British) English but I don't know about American usage.
    Thank you for your examples for OED..But in my Concise Oxford Dictionary there are no such ones.

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