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  1. #1
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    Default 'ice cream' or 'an ice cream'

    Is it usual to say 'an ice cream' or 'two ice creams'?

    My dictionary ways 'ice cream' is an uncountable noun, but I've seen a lot of examples of putting an before 'ice cream' in books.

    ??

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    Dhiva is offline Newbie
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    Post Re: 'ice cream' or 'an ice cream'

    actually it's just ice cream.. because it's uncountable..
    but you can count the ice cream by counting the scoop,the cone or the cup.such:
    "I'd like to buy a cup of ice cream" but in informal or spoken, Some people say "I'd like to buy an ice cream" to make it easier.

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    Default Re: 'ice cream' or 'an ice cream'

    Quote Originally Posted by Dhiva View Post
    actually it's just ice cream.. because it's uncountable..
    but you can count the ice cream by counting the scoop,the cone or the cup.such:
    "I'd like to buy a cup of ice cream" but in informal or spoken, Some people say "I'd like to buy an ice cream" to make it easier.
    'I'd like an ice cream' is not particularly informal. Like many nouns, 'ice cream' can be countable or uncountable, depending on what is meant.

    "I'll get us some ice cream for pudding." - a tub
    "I like ice cream." - the food product.
    In a restaurant: "Two ice creams please." - portions
    "Luke ate three ice creams yesterday afternoon."- ice creams

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 'ice cream' or 'an ice cream'

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    'I'd like an ice cream' is not particularly informal. Like many nouns, 'ice cream' can be countable or uncountable, depending on what is meant.

    "I'll get us some ice cream for pudding." - a tub
    This example might not be understood by most speakers of AmE.
    It seems that in BrE, pudding can be used as a synonym for dessert, while in AmE, it refers to a specific type of dessert.
    Pudding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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