Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default wind-burn = wind-blown

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Then on Saturdays we escaped to the nearby woods and hills, travelling through the suburbs by tramcar, and then walking many miles across the moors, wind-burned and carefree.

    wind-burn = wind-blown

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 12-Aug-2011 at 14:21.

  2. #2
    Amigos4's Avatar
    Amigos4 is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    32,757
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: wind-burn = wind-blown

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    Then on Saturdays we escaped to the nearby woods and hills, travelling through the suburbs by tramcar, and then walking many miles across the moors, wind-burned and carefree.

    wind-burn = wind-blown

    V.
    Hi, Vil!

    I don't equate 'wind-burn' with 'wind-blown'. In my considered opinion, a 'wind-burn' would leave a visible mark on the face. 'Wind-blown' would only tussle my hair and perhaps leave my clothing slightly askew.

    Cheers,
    A4

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    14,511
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: wind-burn = wind-blown

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Hi, Vil!

    I don't equate 'wind-burn' with 'wind-blown'. In my considered opinion, a 'wind-burn' would leave a visible mark on the face. 'Wind-blown' would only tussle my hair and perhaps leave my clothing slightly askew.
    I agree.

    Wind-burn can also make the face tingle or sting.

    Rover

  4. #4
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: wind-burn = wind-blown

    Hi amigos4 and Rover KE,

    I agree with both of you about your weighty rejection of my frivolous interpretation of ďwind-burnĒ.

    Thank you for your kindness.

    V.

  5. #5
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: wind-burn = wind-blown

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I agree with both of you about your weighty rejection of my frivolous interpretation of ďwind-burnĒ.
    It was not frivolous. If I were to suggest that 'wind-blown' meant that somebody had burped in my face, that would be frivolous.

    I can't think of a single adjective to describe your interpretation. Mistaken is a little strong; misinformed would only be appropriate if somebody else had given you the interpretation. The best I can come up with at present is imprecise.

  6. #6
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: wind-burn = wind-blown

    Hi fivejedjon,

    I agree with your Solomon judgment concerning my frivolous interpretation of “wind-burn”. Sure enough it was imprecise. Thank you for your condescension towards my slap-dash writing.

    wind-burn = an irritation or chafing of the skin caused by long exposure to the wind

    Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/windburn#ixzz1UpSgPO4L


    There is another term, namely “weather-beaten” which is very close to my interpretation “wind-blown”.

    weather-beaten= damaged or worn by exposure to the weather

    Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/weather-beaten#ixzz1UpfI14Gb

    This made me think that I may change “weather” with “wind” and so go so far that I identified faulty “wind-burn” and “wind-blown”.

    Now I see, my interpretation is beyond the pale.

    Please excuse my fatuity.

    Thank you again for your unremitting watchfulness.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 12-Aug-2011 at 18:16.

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: wind-burn = wind-blown

    Hi, Vil.
    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I agree with your Solomon judgment concerning my frivolous interpretation of “wind-burn”. Sure enough it was imprecise. Thank you for your condescension towards my slap-dash writing.
    Your interest in words prompts me to pick up another infelicitous usage. Jane Austen used it differently, but 'condescension' is used today with a suggestion of being patronising. I did not intend to appear patronising.

    Also, at the risk of appearing picky, I would not describe your writing as slap-dash (done too quickly and carelessly - ALD). You occasionally come up with an interpretation that is perhaps not the most appropriate, but that is not slap-dash.
    Last edited by 5jj; 12-Aug-2011 at 20:38. Reason: typo

Similar Threads

  1. wind up
    By mehdihas in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-May-2011, 21:29
  2. wind-up
    By Apollo_Doutrinador in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-Mar-2009, 18:22
  3. [General] wind up
    By Yankees Fan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2008, 03:10
  4. wind up
    By Humble in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 22-Feb-2007, 04:57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •