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    #1

    Wink learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Hi.
    Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (has 's after Merriam-Webster) and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (doesn't have 's after Oxford), what are the differences between them?
    Why it is 'Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary' , but 'Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary',
    because I think that dictionary can be used by some learners (not just a learner).
    Thanks very much!

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    #2

    Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Hi!

    No teacher!

    Learner is singular in "Learner's Dictionary".
    Learner is plural (Learners) in "Learners' Dictionary".

    Hope this was the right answer

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Quote Originally Posted by khanhhung2512 View Post
    Hi.
    Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (has 's after Merriam-Webster) and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (doesn't have 's after Oxford), what are the differences between them?
    Why it is 'Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary' , but 'Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary',
    because I think that dictionary can be used by some learners (not just a learner).
    Thanks very much!
    A Learner's Dictionary is suited to a learner. It's a good dictionary for a learner.
    A Learners' Dictionary is suited to learners. It's a good dictionary for learners.
    They're both correct; and they mean the same thing in this context.

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    #4

    Wink Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Quote Originally Posted by virus99 View Post
    Hi!

    No teacher!

    Learner is singular in "Learner's Dictionary".
    Learner is plural (Learners) in "Learners' Dictionary".

    Hope this was the right answer
    Oh, I already knew that, my question is why "Learner's Dictionary" is being used in stead of "Learners' Dictionary".
    Thanks anyway.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Quote Originally Posted by khanhhung2512 View Post
    Oh, I already knew that, my question is why "Learner's Dictionary" is being used instead of "Learners' Dictionary".
    Thanks anyway.
    I have asked myself a similar question about why EFL course books usually have a Student's Book and a Teacher's Book. The s' form would appear to be more logical.

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    #6

    Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Quote Originally Posted by khanhhung2512 View Post
    Hi.
    Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (has 's after Merriam-Webster) and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (doesn't have 's after Oxford), what are the differences between them?
    Why it is 'Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary' , but 'Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary',
    because I think that dictionary can be used by some learners (not just a learner).
    Thanks very much!

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) I think that native speakers and learners forget one important fact:

    Language was only oral (spoken) long before human beings learned to write.

    (2) Thus when you hear the word "learners," your mind can put the comma

    wherever you wish.

    (3) There is really no "rule" that everybody follows all the time. For example, here in

    the United States we have one day each year to honor our 44 presidents.

    I have seen it spelled as:


    (a) Presidents' Day.

    (b) President's Day.

    (c) Presidents Day.

    Some people feel that (a) is the correct answer; some feel that (b) "looks" better; and

    some like (c) because they dislike apostrophes.

    (4) If you ever have a test on this matter, I would definitely recommend

    "learners' dictionary." It is somewhat similar to "boys' bathroom." Surely,

    no one would write "boy's bathroom."

  3. suprunp's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Surely,

    no one would write "boy's bathroom."
    NOT A TEACHER

    There were ten {farmer's/farmers'} wives at the meeting.

    Notice, [...], that the expression farmer's wives does not imply polygamy: if this is a descriptive genitive, it is simply the plural of farmer's wife. The change to the plural genitive farmers' wives may, however, be preferred.


    In many cases the first noun ends with an s, which can be written in three ways:
    a girl's school [genitive singular]
    a girls' school [genitive plural]
    a girls school [common case plural]

    (A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language)

    Judging by what professor Quirk says and if I didn't know, I might as well write "boy's bathroom".

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    Quote Originally Posted by suprunp View Post
    Judging by what professor Quirk says and if I didn't know, I might as well write "boy's bathroom".
    Most people wouldn't even notice.

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    #9

    Wink Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    And what about Oxford and Merriam-Webster's?
    And I'm a little confused about the use of proper nouns.
    E.g.: 'Korea National University of Arts' and 'Australian National University' (not Australia)
    And what are the differences between 'Korea National University of Arts' and 'Korea's National University of Arts' and 'Korean National University of Arts'?
    Thanks!

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    #10

    Wink Re: learner's and learners'; Oxford and Merriam-Webster's

    PS: If I have made any grammar mistakes, please let me know!

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