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Thread: Letter "T"

  1. #1
    bagzi94's Avatar
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    Default Letter "T"

    Do you pronounce letter "T" when you say:
    It doesn't matter.
    and
    What are you doing?

    And what about letter "G" in the second sentence?

    When it comes to British English, of course.

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    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    The letter "t" isn't silent in these words, but how it's pronounced dependa on who's speaking. In the second sentence, "ng" is a digraph. It's pronounced /ŋ/, not /ŋg/, by most speakers.

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    DontBanMe is offline Member
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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    Quote Originally Posted by bagzi94 View Post
    Do you pronounce letter "T" when you say:
    It doesn't matter.
    and
    What are you doing?

    And what about letter "G" in the second sentence?

    When it comes to British English, of course.
    Well, if you ask me, for American English, the /t/ sound like the /d/ sound. That's what we called the flap t sound.
    As for the ng sound, here are some link for you. Phonetics: The sounds of American English
    NG Consonant: American English Pronunciation - YouTube

    Hope these helps!

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    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    In the second sentence, "ng" is a digraph. It's pronounced /ŋ/, not /ŋg/, by most speakers.
    This is one of those rare occasions when I disagree with you, BC. In 'England' and 'English', as in 'finger', 'angry' and quite a few other words, we pronounce ng as /ŋg/.

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    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    This is one of those rare occasions when I disagree with you, BC. In 'England' and 'English', as in 'finger', 'angry' and quite a few other words, we pronounce ng as /ŋg/.
    Yes, of course. "In this sentence" was meant to narrow the scope of my statement, but I can see now that it wasn't clear enough. Thank you.

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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Yes, of course. "In this sentence" was meant to narrow the scope of my statement, but I can see now that it wasn't clear enough. Thank you.
    I have just seen that I was careless. You were referring to "What are you doing?", and your answer was correct. I carelessly took the reference to be to 'When it comes to British English. of course'. I was wrong.

    Sorry.

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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    I'm a bit confused, 5jj and BC. When you say 'in this sentence' do you really mean sentence, or in final position, or something else? I've been taught to pronounce ng as /ŋ/ always in the -ing verb ending--in most words, actually. And that's what I've always heard, too. Would it be different in another sentence? Perhaps if doing were followed by a word beginning with a vowel?

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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hedwig View Post
    I'm a bit confused, 5jj and BC. When you say 'in this sentence' do you really mean sentence, or in final position, or something else? I've been taught to pronounce ng as /ŋ/ always in the -ing verb ending--in most words, actually. And that's what I've always heard, too. Would it be different in another sentence? Perhaps if doing were followed by a word beginning with a vowel?
    For most native speakers, ng in the -ing ending is always /ŋ/, even when it is followed by a vowel. For speakers of some dialects, it is always /ŋg/. This is true whenever ng comes at the end of a word, or of a stem.

    It is usually /ŋg/ in the middle of the word, except as a stem-ending - compare' finger' ( /ŋg/) and 'singer' ( /ŋ/)

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    Kathleen Shuster is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    In these cases, the "t" and the "g" are soft sounds. You can hear them when you pronounce the words but they are not strongly pronounced.

    Kathleen

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    Default Re: Letter "T"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kathleen Shuster View Post
    In these cases, the "t" and the "g" are soft sounds. You can hear them when you pronounce the words but they are not strongly pronounced.
    I don't know what you mean by 'soft sounds'.

    The /t/ in 'matter' may be voiced in AmE (and may be glottalised in some dialects of BrE), but I don't see what makes it 'soft'.

    We pronounce /g/ in the words we have been discussing always, and only, in the situations I have described. Whether or not it is pronounced depends on the word itself, and on the dialect of the speaker.
    Last edited by 5jj; 23-Aug-2011 at 17:20. Reason: typo

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