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Thread: stick

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    #1

    stick

    I would like to know the difference between "1" and "2".
    1. The door is sticking.
    2. The door is stuck.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: stick

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know the difference between "1" and "2".
    1. The door is sticking.
    2. The door is stuck.
    In #1 you may be able to open it with difficulty; in #2, you can't.

    I'd use 'jam' rather than 'stick'.

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    #3

    Re: stick

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know the difference between "1" and "2".
    1. The door is sticking. At the moment.
    2. The door is stuck. At the moment OR has been for some period of time. Context would suggest which.
    b.

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    #4

    Re: stick

    I would say that "The door is sticking" could also be used when it has been the situation for some time.

    If my door is difficult to open but can be opened, that may have been the case for quite some time.

    "Can someone please come and fix my door. It's sticking. It's been doing it for weeks."

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    #5

    Re: stick

    In most cases, unless context shows otherwise, there is no real difference in meaning.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: stick

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    In most cases, unless context shows otherwise, there is no real difference in meaning.
    I agree. In my earlier post I wrote, " In #1 you may be able to open it with difficulty". I'd just like to add now, "if the context suggests this"

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