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  1. #1
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    comma, purpose or result?

    The use of comma(,), is it to denote result or purpose? Both seems to work, but there seems to be a special reason in using it.

    ex)Newer homes especially can benefit from air-cleaning plants; that's because new construction is better insulated and and selaed, to conserve air conditioning and heating.

  2. #2
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    Re: comma, purpose or result?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    The use of comma(,) , is it to denote result or purpose?
    You don't put a comma between the subject and the verb.
    Both seems to work, but there seems to be a special reason in using it.

    ex)Newer homes especially can benefit from air-cleaning plants; that's because new construction is better insulated and and sealed, to conserve air conditioning and heating.
    Yes, there does. I'd suggest that a comma is used here to make sure the sentence means that both the insulation and the sealing contribute to the conservation of air-conditioning and heating., ie. the meaning is:
    " ... better [insulated and sealed] to [conserve air conditioning and heating.]" rather than:
    " ... [better insulated] and [sealed to conserve air conditioning and heating.]", which could be the case if the comma wasn't there.

    I'm not sure what you mean by result and purpose.

  3. #3
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    Re: comma, purpose or result?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, there does. I'd suggest that a comma is used here to make sure the sentence means that both the insulation and the sealing contribute to the conservation of air-conditioning and heating., ie. the meaning is:
    " ... better [insulated and sealed] to [conserve air conditioning and heating.]" rather than:
    " ... [better insulated] and [sealed to conserve air conditioning and heating.]", which could be the case if the comma wasn't there.

    I'm not sure what you mean by result and purpose.
    By result, I mean , it was better insulated and sealed and as a result, it conserved air conditionig and heating.
    By purpose, I mean , it was better insulated and sealed in order to conserve air conditionig and heating.
    By cause, I mean , it was better insulated and sealed because it conserved air conditionig and heating.

    Which of the three is the comma for?

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: comma, purpose or result?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    By result, I mean , it was better insulated and sealed and as a result, it conserved air conditionig and heating.
    By purpose, I mean , it was better insulated and sealed in order to conserve air conditionig and heating.
    By cause, I mean , it was better insulated and sealed because it conserved air conditionig and heating.

    Which of the three is the comma for?
    The comma's for none of those reasons. It's for reason I mentioned, I believe.
    The sentence means "in order to", but the comma doesn't change that meaning.

  5. #5
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    Re: comma, purpose or result?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The comma's for none of those reasons. It's for reason I mentioned, I believe.
    The sentence means "in order to", but the comma doesn't change that meaning.
    I'm sorry, now I realize the comma was to prevent confusion, in order to describe the previous two things, not one. I'm sorry!

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