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  1. #1
    HaraKiriBlade's Avatar
    HaraKiriBlade is offline Member
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    Default Take out and put back in?

    I was trying to explain to my friend yesterday how I dropped my mp3 player years ago and that it's never been working the same. Somewhere along the line I said "The cord got caught in the bus door and my mp3 player got yanked out of my pocket. It made a hard landfall and I had to take the battery out and put it back in to get it working."

    Is there anything I said that sounds awkward? maybe where I had to 'take out' the battery and 'put it back in'? I don't know, at that time when I actually spoke out the sentence I felt mind-boggled, trying to find the right words.

    Please let me know, and thank you very much.

  2. #2
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Take out and put back in?

    Hello HKB

    I'd make one tiny adjustment:

    "The cord got caught in the bus door and my mp3 player got yanked out of my pocket. It made a hard landfall and I had to take the battery out and put it back in again to get it working."

    The "again" looks a little redundant; but it's what people say, strangely enough.

    In fact, you might even hear an additional "again" after "working".

    MrP

  3. #3
    HaraKiriBlade's Avatar
    HaraKiriBlade is offline Member
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    Default Re: Take out and put back in?

    Thank you Mr. Pedantic.

    I have one question, it kind of flashed in me minutes ago, but I realized I use 'caught in' and 'caught on to' interchangably. Now I know that 'caught in' is right, I want to ask if 'caught on to' is valid. If it is, do they mean the same or different?

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Take out and put back in?

    Hello HK

    If something is trapped inside something else and held, it's "caught in":

    1. My coat got caught in the tube train doors.
    2. My tie got caught in the shredder.

    If something is hooked on or snagged over something else and held, it's "caught on":

    3. My trousers got caught on the barbed wire.
    4. My jumper got caught on the door handle.

    Bye
    MrP

  5. #5
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Take out and put back in?

    Caught on to is also idiomatic American English for understanding something that is not immediately apparent.

    "She kept tilting her head toward the exit until I finally caught on to her meaning."

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