Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    bundle/ go a bundle on somebody (something)

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Van Corlear stopped occasionally in the villages to eat pumpkin pies, dance at country frolics, and bundle with the Yankee lasses.

    bundle = to sleep on the same bed without undressing; -- applied to the custom of a man and woman, especially lovers

    Brewing black, pungent liquor, Bryony, said he went the bundle on tea himself.

    go a bundle on somebody (something)= be fond of someone (something), have a soft spot in one’s heart for someone (something)

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 13-Sep-2011 at 18:04.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,764
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: bundle/ go a bundle on somebody (something)

    I have a feeling this may be related to the Contract Bridge bid 'an abundance in <suit>' (which means you have high expectations for your partnership's chances). But don't take my word for it...

    (Another Bridge-based metaphor is to do/think/say... something 'in spades' - spades being the highest-valued suit.)

    b

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: bundle/ go a bundle on somebody (something)

    Hi BobK,

    Thank you for your alternative explanation of the interpretation in question.

    Thank you also for the further bridge-metaphor.

    I see what you mean, namely when you say you have something in spades means that you have more of it than other people. Certainly it may be good or bad.

    For instance, to say “Nick and Charlie both have intelligence in spades,” means they’re both really smart.
    But to say “Michelle’s house has rats in spades” means that she has a problem.

    My interpretation is based on the written in the following link:

    going a bundle on - definition of going a bundle on by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    namely:

    3. Slang a large sum of money
    go a bundle on Slang to be extremely fond of

    If you are really extremely fond of someone (something) you would be ready to lay out many, many money to gratify yours passion (in order to supply your needs of ….).

    Thank you for your kindness of late days.

    V.

Similar Threads

  1. Bundle of straw
    By Baski in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 15-Mar-2008, 13:42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •