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  1. #1
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please help me to solve this problem?

    Example 1: I have been looking for you everywhere.

    "Parsing" = sentence analysis (correct use ?)

    Form + Function :
    I = Noun Phrase = subject
    have been looking = Verb Phrase = transitive verb
    for you = Prepositional Phrase you = object of the prep. "for"
    everywhere = Adverb Phrase = adverbial of place

    OR

    have been looking for = Verb Phrase = transitive verb
    you = Noun Phrase = direct object

    Example 2: The building opposite our school is being pulled down.

    Form + Function:
    The building ... shcool = NP = subject
    is being pulled down = VP = intransitive verb

    OR

    is being pulled = Verb Phrase = intransitive verb
    down = Adverb Phrase = adverbial of place ??

    Do you consider "look for" and "pulled down" as prepositional verbs or as phrasal verbs? i.e. should "for" and "down" be part of the verb or start a new sentence element?

    Thank you for your help.
    Hela

  2. #2
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    Default Re: sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    Hi , Hela.

    Example 1: I have been looking for you everywhere.

    "I"
    Form: 1st person singular, subject pronoun
    Function: subject

    "have been looking"
    Form: present perfect continious verb
    Function: verb

    "looking for"
    Form: verb + preposition
    Function: part of the present perfect continious form "have been"

    Note, look means to appear (e.g., Max looks tired), whereas look for means to search. (e.g., Let's look for Max.)

    "for you"
    Form: prepositional phrase
    Function: object of "looking"

    "for"
    Form: preposition

    "you"
    Form: 2nd person singular, object pronoun

    "everywhere"
    Form: adverb
    Function: adverb of location/place


    Example 2: The building opposite our school is being pulled down.

    They are going to pull down the building ~ They are going to pull the building down (to the ground).

    "down"
    Form: preposition (e.g., pull down the shade ~ pull the shade down)
    Function: adverb

  3. #3
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    So if I understood you well, Casiopea, in sentence analysis a preposition or an adverb following a verb is never part of the verb phrase but always starts a new sentence element, right ?

    Second, how can I know when a word is a preposition or an adverb; a conjunction or an adverb ? You must have explained these things to me before, but my brain "fait un blocage" (how do you say that in English) whenever I deal with these points of grammar.

    Third, how do you distinguish a phrasal verb from a prepositional verb? Does it have something to do with the position of the object that may follow them? If an object cannot be inserted between the verb and its particle it is called a prepositional verb and when it must be inserted between the 2 parts of speech it's a phrasal verb?

    Sorry to ask always the same questions...
    Héla

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    Default Re: sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    "fait un blocage"
    What language is that, may I ask?

  5. #5
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    It's French.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    It's French.
    I guessed so. Thanks, all the same. To my knowledge, French is similar to Arabic in which all nouns (and pronouns) are either masculine or feminine and also Arabic has its own grammatical rules/guidelines which differ from(sometimes contradictory to) those of English and that, I presume, is also the case with French. Now, I understand why you are so particular/curious about the "part of speech" of each and every word in an English sentence. Good luck to you in your endeavours!
    Last edited by Temico; 08-Oct-2005 at 14:39.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    Hi, Hela.

    Everything is here: The History of Phrasal Verbs
    http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~cpercy...361lamont.html

    Let's continue our discussion after you've had a chance to read what it has to offer.

    "fait au blocage", my mind went blank.

  8. #8
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: sentence analysis of phrasal verbs

    OK, I'll do that.

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