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Thread: working

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    #1

    working

    I have two questions.
    I wonder if "working" is gerund or anything.
    I would like to know the subject of "work"

    I got my first part-time job working at a car wash.

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    #2

    Re: working

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I have two questions.
    I wonder if "working" is gerund or anything.
    I would like to know the subject of "work"

    I got my first part-time job working at a car wash.
    I am not a teacher, but as no one else has answered this post, I'll have a go.

    I think "working at a car wash" is an -ing participle clause which functions as a postmodifier of the noun "job". The clause has no explicit subject but the implicit subject is "job" (his job is working at a car wash).

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    #3

    Re: working

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Jugg View Post
    I am not a teacher, but as no one else has answered this post, I'll have a go.

    I think "working at a car wash" is an -ing participle clause which functions as a postmodifier of the noun "job". The clause has no explicit subject but the implicit subject is "job" (his job is working at a car wash).
    "job" is a direct object, isn't it? (got what? - a job)

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    #4

    Re: working

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I have two questions.
    I wonder if "working" is gerund or anything.
    I would like to know the subject of "work"

    I got my first part-time job working at a car wash.
    The non-finite clause serves to elaborate on or further explain "my .. job". It stands in apposition to "my ... job", the preceding noun phrase.

    my first part-time job = working at a car wash

    Gerund.

    The -ing clause may have a temporal adverbial reading too, but that would be a tad far-fetched, IMO.


    I would like to know the subject of "work"
    my job, my working, the speaker of " I"

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    #5

    Re: working

    Quote Originally Posted by Bennevis View Post
    "job" is a direct object, isn't it? (got what? - a job)
    Indeed it is the direct object of the main clause but it also serves as the logical subject of the -ing participle clause

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    #6

    Re: working

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Jugg View Post
    Indeed it is the direct object of the main clause but it also serves as the logical subject of the -ing participle clause
    "Job" being the logical subject is illogical to me. How can "my job" perform the working?

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Jugg View Post
    The clause has no explicit subject but the implicit subject is "job" (his job is working at a car wash).
    His job is that he is working...
    It is not his job that is doing the working; it is him that is working.

    His job is working at a car wash. --> [His job] = [(his) working at a car wash].
    ------------------
    Peter is working at a car wash --> [Peter] [is working] [at a car wash].
    His job is working at a car wash --> [His job] [is working] [at a car wash].

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Jugg View Post
    -ing participle clause which functions as a postmodifier
    Renames is more like it, IMO.
    Last edited by Afit; 24-Sep-2011 at 20:30.

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    #7

    Re: working

    I'm sure you're right: you're an English teacher; I'm not

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    #8

    Re: working

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Jugg View Post
    I'm sure you're right: you're an English teacher; I'm not
    Being a teacher does not make one right. The soundness of one's argument makes one right.

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    #9

    Re: working

    Quote Originally Posted by Afit View Post
    Being a teacher does not make one right. The soundness of one's argument makes one right.
    Oh, all right then. As you are an English teacher, your argument is more likely to be sound than mine. I've probably misunderstood what I've read in the grammar books.

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