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    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default to be at a loose end

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    Campion was a mining engineer, whom the Sultan on his way to England had met in Singapore and finding him at a loose end had commissioned to go to Semibulu. (W. S. Maugham)

    He seemed to be at a loose end and when his visit to his friends was drawing to a close she told him they would b very much pleased if he would com and spend a fortnight with them. (W. S. Maugham)

    She’s at a loose end, you know, badly wants something to do. (J. Galsworthy)

    “Oh, there you are,” he said as soon as Charles emerged. “You’ll be at a loose end for a bit this morning, I expect?” (J. Wain) (

    to be at a loose end = to have no definite occupation

    V.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: to be at a loose end

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    Campion was a mining engineer, whom the Sultan on his way to England had met in Singapore and finding him at a loose end had commissioned to go to Semibulu. (W. S. Maugham)

    He seemed to be at a loose end and when his visit to his friends was drawing to a close she told him they would b very much pleased if he would com and spend a fortnight with them. (W. S. Maugham)

    She’s at a loose end, you know, badly wants something to do. (J. Galsworthy)

    “Oh, there you are,” he said as soon as Charles emerged. “You’ll be at a loose end for a bit this morning, I expect?” (J. Wain) (

    to be at a loose end = to have no definite occupation

    V.
    It doesn't have to be an occupation (job), it simply means that you have nothing to do.

    - Do you fancy going to the cinema?
    - Yeah, why not? I'm at a bit of a loose end this evening.

    - What are you doing tonight?
    - Nothing. I'm at a loose end, to be honest.
    - Excellent. Come to my house for dinner then.

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