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  1. #1
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    Default Commas or dashes?

    What is the correct missing punctuation in the following sentence:

    If you're having a bad day, I don't see why I should be made to suffer for it or if you're really good at your job why I should even be made aware of it.

    Please explain why your answer is correct. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Commas or dashes?

    Can the sentence be rewritten(for clarity) without changing the wording?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Commas or dashes?

    Here is one possible way of punctuation this sentence, and perhaps the meaning will be made clearer by doing so. But is this punctuation correct?
    Should I have used dashes instead of commas?


    If you're having a bad day, I don't see why I should be made to suffer for it or, if you're really good at your job, why I should even be made aware of it. (the bad day, that is)

    perhaps it should read: if you were really good at your job, etc.
    But that still leaves the questions of dashes or commas.

  4. #4
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Commas or dashes?

    I would call this a run-on sentence and correct it this way:

    If you're having a bad day I don't see why I should be made to suffer for it. If you're really good at your job why should I even be made aware of the kind of day you're having.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Commas or dashes?

    Yes, I see your point. The sentence is too unwieldy. I was trying to avoid the akwardness of using the word "made" in two consecutive sentences. But we've gone far astray of my original dilemma, and that was my confusion about when to use commas as opposed to dashes. I've never clearly understood what constitutes a parenthetical phrase as oposed to one requiring dashes or commas.

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