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  1. #1
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    Default or so I've been told

    What does it mean " a sensation as sweet as seeing ourselves in our dreams"? Why does quoting tense make such a fanstatic feeling? I don't get part "as sweet as seeing ourselves in our dream", It's really hard to understand,

    ex)In the Turkich language, we have a special tense that allows us to distinguish hearsay from what we've seen with our own eyes; when we are relating past events we could not have witnessed, we use this tense. It is a useful distinction to make as we remember out earliest life experiences reported by our parents, stories to which we listen with the same rapt attention we might pay to some brilliant tale of some other person. It's a sensation as sweet as seeing ourselves in our dreams, so I feel compelled to add "or so I've been told" before closing a sentence. However, we pay a heavy price for it; Once imprinted in our minds, other people's report of what we've done end up mattering more than what we ourselves remember, even shaping our understanding of our lives.
    Last edited by keannu; 22-Sep-2011 at 05:10.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: or so I've been told

    I guess it probably means we can see our experiences from object point of view not subjectively.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: or so I've been told

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I guess it probably means we can see our experiences from object point of view not subjectively.
    What do you mean by "or so I've been told" in the second underlined?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: or so I've been told

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    What does it mean " a sensation as sweet as seeing ourselves in our dreams"? Why does quoting tense make such a fanstatic feeling? I don't get part "as sweet as seeing ourselves in our dream", It's really hard to understand,

    ex)In the Turkich language, we have a special tense
    Do you mean "a special sense"? 'Tense' makes no sense.
    EDIT: Sorry, tense does make sense.

    that allows us to distinguish hearsay from what we've seen with our own eyes; when we are relating past events we could not have witnessed, we use this tense. It is a useful distinction to make as we remember out earliest life experiences reported by our parents, stories to which we listen with the same rapt attention we might pay to some brilliant tale of some other person. It's a sensation as sweet as seeing ourselves in our dreams,
    I don't understand this either.

    so I feel compelled to add "or so I've been told" before closing a sentence. However, we pay a heavy price for it; Once imprinted in our minds, other people's report of what we've done end up mattering more than what we ourselves remember, even shaping our understanding of our lives.
    This is not good English. Obviously it's been written by a Turk; you might have to ask a Turk what it means.
    Last edited by Raymott; 23-Sep-2011 at 10:47.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: or so I've been told

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    This is not good English. Obviously it's been written by a Turk; you might have to ask a Turk what it means.
    Maybe, he made all the expressions in Turkich way, that's why even native speakers like you can't understand it. I really tried to understand this to explain to my student as this is a question of a workbook for university entrance exam which matters a lot in Korea. I think the workbook makers selected this carelessly.
    But if there's someone who can understand this even by half, please let me know.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: or so I've been told

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Maybe, he made all the expressions in Turkich way, that's why even native speakers like you can't understand it. I really tried to understand this to explain to my student as this is a question of a workbook for university entrance exam which matters a lot in Korea. I think the workbook makers selected this carelessly.
    But if there's someone who can understand this even by half, please let me know.
    Sorry, I read it again. "Tense" does make sense. Turkish has a special tense for reported speech. I think it's saying that since there is a special tense for hearsay, this tends to give credibility to anything that a person says, whether it true or not. And hence, what other people say in Turkish tends to have a significance beyond that which hearsay would in another language - at least subjectively, in people's minds.

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