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  1. #11
    coolpro is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    No, I don't. I know the Russian alphabet and some phrases though.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    Quote Originally Posted by coolpro View Post
    No, I don't. I know the Russian alphabet and some phrases though.
    There is a beautiful grammar book. It's in Russian, but it does name some of the stuff in English. Here it is:

    .* .., ..

  3. #13
    coolpro is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    Thanks. I have several e-books about the syntax of the English language.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    Quote Originally Posted by coolpro View Post
    Thanks. I have several e-books about the syntax of the English language.
    Wait for the Dutch guy. He knows the ropes.

  5. #15
    Afit is offline Member
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    Quote Originally Posted by coolpro View Post
    "[[They] [[shot] [him] [in [what appears to be] a gangland killing.]]]".

    What is the grammatical function of the clause "what appears to be"?
    Nothing, IMO. It is not a single constituent in the sentence.

    They shot him [in [something [that appears to be a gangland killing]]].
    They shot him [in [w [hat appears to be a gangland killing]]].
    what appears to be a gangland killing = nominal relative clause

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    I found this online:

    24— ‘they talked to the casino about what had happened’
    ‘Talk’ is a prepositional verb. When it has an object, the preposition ‘to’ must be put between the object and the verb. In the text, the object is the noun clause ‘what happened,’ but the verb can also have a noun phrase as its object as in “He wanted to talk to a good lawyer.”

    about what had happened

    in what appears


    Do you see any similarities?

    Can we say "what appears to be a gangland killing" is the object of the preposition "in"?

    Look here too.

    And here:

    In class today, we talked about what Mr. Duncan expects in our next research essay.

    About = preposition; what Mr. Duncan expects in our next research essay = noun clause or the object of the preposition.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    So "what appears to be" is a noun clause functioning as an object of a preposition?

    Here is what this source says:
    She found fault in what he had asked her.

    The clause "what he had asked her" is the
    object of the preposition
    "in" in this sentence.

  8. #18
    coolpro is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    How about the sentence She - I think - is friendly. ?

    I think is a separate clause. But it's an independent clause. So could be say that there is no function of I think?

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    Quote Originally Posted by coolpro View Post
    How about the sentence She - I think - is friendly. ?

    I think is a separate clause. But it's an independent clause. So could be say that there is no function of I think?
    It's a stance adverbial.

    "The category that is called ‘comment clauses’ belongs to stance adverbials as well. Comment clauses are primarily a spoken feature, being especially common in conversation. However, the expression it seems (and occasionally it appears) is used as a comment clause in the expository written registers.
    For instance: Neither, it seems, does it believe in newfangled technology. In speech, they often have a parenthetic role, with “increased speed” and “decreased loudness”.

    For example: The rest, I suppose, will never be known."

  10. #20
    coolpro is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Grammatical function

    Why isn't what appears to be a stance adverbal as well?

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