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Thread: Block Language

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    #1

    Arrow Block Language

    Block language, for English, is used for captions, titles and newspapers headlines.
    Besides articles like "a", "an", and "the" which are always removed, are prepositions like "in", "at", "on", etc liberally dropped as well?

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    #2

    Re: Block Language

    Quote Originally Posted by NancyAr View Post
    Block language, for English, is used for captions, titles and newspapers headlines.
    Besides articles like "a", "an", and "the" which are always removed, are prepositions like "in", "at", "on", etc liberally dropped as well?
    No. These words carry meaning.

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    #3

    Re: Block Language

    From some school website, I found:

    "Available January and June"

    It looks like "in" was removed from between "Available" and "January and June".

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    #4

    Re: Block Language

    Quote Originally Posted by NancyAr View Post
    "Available January and June"

    It looks like "in" was removed from between "Available" and "January and June".
    It does - that is, if it was ever there.

    You asked if prepositions were 'liberally dropped'. They are not.

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    #5

    Re: Block Language

    I thought "in" is necessary before the months the year.

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    It does - that is, if it was ever there.
    If that's true, that means I could write the following and pass it off as a COMPLETE SENTENCE:

    "The class is available January and June."

    How could this be?

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    #6

    Re: Block Language

    Quote Originally Posted by NancyAr View Post
    I thought "in" is necessary before the months the year.


    If that's true, that means I could write the following and pass it off as a COMPLETE SENTENCE:

    "The class is available January and June."

    How could this be?
    If you wrote that, everyone would understand it. Most people would notice the missing "in", some wouldn't, and some might say it needs two "in"s (one before January and one before June).

    But you asked if they were liberally dropped in headlines etc. The sentence you have posted does not appear to be a headline or a title. Had it simply said "Class available January and June", then it would be fine and commonly seen in perhaps a college timetable.

    You will find a lot of instances where the preposition is dropped before days, months etc.

    He was born January 1970.
    The sale runs Monday through/to Friday.
    I took my exams July 2009.

    To me, 1 and 3 are unnatural but I've heard them many times, perhaps mostly in AmE.

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    #7

    Re: Block Language

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post

    You will find a lot of instances where the preposition is dropped before days, months etc.

    1. He was born January 1970.
    2. The sale runs Monday through/to Friday.
    3. I took my exams July 2009.

    To me, 1 and 3 are unnatural but I've heard them many times, perhaps mostly in AmE.
    Would the following, which doesn't contain a particular year like 1 or 3, be unnatural in BrE, but common in AmE:
    "The class is available January and June."

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    #8

    Re: Block Language

    Quote Originally Posted by NamcyAr View Post
    Would the following, which doesn't contain a particular year like 1 or 3, be unnatural in BrE, but common in AmE:
    "The class is available January and June."
    It is not necessarily unnatural to all speakers of BrE.

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    #9

    Re: Block Language

    emsr2d2's examples:

    1. He was born January 1970.
    2. The sale runs Monday through/to Friday.
    3. I took my exams July 2009.

    Modifying 1 and 3 slightly:

    1a. He was born January.
    3a. I took my exams July.

    Would 1a and 3a, from which year-expressions were removed, still be acceptable?

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    #10

    Re: Block Language

    Quote Originally Posted by NamcyAr View Post
    1a. He was born January........3a. I took my exams July.

    Would 1a and 3a, from which year-expressions were removed, still be acceptable?
    1a. Only if we are talking about a baby.
    3a To some people.

    It's a lot simpler, and more natural, to use 'in' in all your examples. As I said some time ago, "You asked if prepositions were 'liberally dropped'. They are not"

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