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  1. #11
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    I'm wondering if there's a difference between using the word as an endearment and using it as the noun for sweets (candies).

    I think I would write:

    Hi sweetie! How are you? (Endearment)

    Hello little girl. Would you like a sweety? (Candy)

    The online dictionary I checked simply says that "sweety" is an alternative spelling for "sweetie" for both meanings though.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm wondering if there's a difference between using the word as an endearment and using it as the noun for sweets (candies).

    I think I would write:

    Hi sweetie! How are you? (Endearment)

    Hello little girl. Would you like a sweety? (Candy)

    The online dictionary I checked simply says that "sweety" is an alternative spelling for "sweetie" for both meanings though.
    I've never heard of "sweety" for sweets. But I guess it's correct BrE.

    An idea passed through my mind that "Sweetie" might be feminine and "Sweety" masculine. There is no evidence for this, but there are some words that act this way, specially with names (though this is changing)

    Lesley (m), Leslie (f); Andy/Andie; Tony/Toni; Franky/Frankie; Jacky/Jackie(Jacqui) ... Sweety/Sweetie.

  3. #13
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I've never heard of "sweety" for sweets. But I guess it's correct BrE.

    An idea passed through my mind that "Sweetie" might be feminine and "Sweety" masculine. There is no evidence for this, but there are some words that act this way, specially with names (though this is changing)

    Lesley (m), Leslie (f); Andy/Andie; Tony/Toni; Franky/Frankie; Jacky/Jackie(Jacqui) ... Sweety/Sweetie.
    It's used a lot in BrE.

    Mum, can I have sweeties?
    If you eat all those sweeties, you won't have room for dinner.
    I have a bag of sweeties in the car.

    It's generally used around children but plenty of adults I know say it too, although perhaps in a slightly childish voice!

    That's an interesting thought about masc/fem versions. I have no idea.

  4. #14
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    I'd offer my sweetie a sweetie, and think she'd do the same.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    This side of the Atlantic, I've never heard "sweety" for a piece of candy. I like it, but I haven't heard it.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. #16
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Little shops, usually on corners in residential areas, were known by two names:

    - Corner shops
    - Sweetie shops

    There are now quite a lot of nostalgic shops where you can buy boiled sweets (Cola Cubes, Pineapple Chunks) loose from plastic jars, something which went out of favour in the late 80s. If the owner wants to make such a shop sound even more old-fashioned, they might use those rather twee words which they seem to think are cute:

    Ye Olde Worlde Sweetye Shoppe


  7. #17
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    This side of the Atlantic, I've never heard "sweety" for a piece of candy. I like it, but I haven't heard it.
    We don't use candy much.

  8. #18
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    We don't use candy much.
    That's true. I'm still a little confused with the American use of candy - does it mean boiled sugar sweets or does it mean chocolate. It seems to mean both.

    A Dime Bar is a candy bar.
    I have a bag of candies.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    "Candy" is very broad. Just about anything you can buy from Hershey is candy.

    A chocolate bar, a small wrapped peppermint, a toffee, jelly beans... If it's really sweet and not baked, it is likely a candy.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  10. #20
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: sweety to mean sweetie

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    "Candy" is very broad. Just about anything you can buy from Hershey is candy.

    A chocolate bar, a small wrapped peppermint, a toffee, jelly beans... If it's really sweet and not baked, it is likely a candy.
    Ah, thanks for the clarification.

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