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  1. #1
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    Question intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    Dear all;

    Would you please tell me the difference between these words?

    (1)intransitive verbs
    (2)nontransitive verbs

    *Andalso would ya pls tell me what we call some verbs which object complement are used after ?( such as: elect, consider,name,)

    Best wishes

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    Default Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    The term "nontransitive" refers to verbs that are not transitive, which leaves intransitive verbs, ergative/unaccusative verbs, and possibly (depending on how you view it) copular/linking verbs.

    The verbs "elect", "consider", and "name" are called complex-transitive verbs.

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    Default Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    1. Direct objects

    Most of the verbs examined so far have been in the Active Voice. When a verb is in the Active Voice, the subject of the verb refers to the person or thing performing the action described by the verb; and the object of the verb refers to the person or thing receiving the action described by the verb.

    In the following examples, the objects of the verbs are printed in bold type.
    e.g. He read the book.
    I did not see the balloon.
    They ate the potatoes quickly.
    She rode her bicycle along the sidewalk.
    Do we understand it?

    In these sentences, the verbs read, did see, ate, rode and do understand are in the Active Voice; and the words book, balloon, potatoes, bicycle and it are the objects of the verbs. These objects are said to be direct objects, because they refer to things which receive directly the actions described by the verbs.



    2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

    Verbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.

    Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to fly is intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.

    However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.
    Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
    Transitive: to lay laid laid
    Intransitive: to lie lay lain

    Transitive: to raise raised raised
    Intransitive: to rise rose risen

    Transitive: to set set set
    Intransitive: to sit sat sat


    Particular care must be taken not to confuse the verbs to lay and to lie, since, as shown above, the Simple Past of the verb to lie has the same form as the bare infinitive of the verb to lay.

    a. To Lay and To Lie
    To lay is a transitive verb, which can take an object. The following examples illustrate the use of the Present Continuous, Simple Past, and Present Perfect tenses of the verb to lay. The verbs are underlined, and the objects of the verbs are printed in bold type.
    e.g. I am laying the table.
    He laid a bet on the white horse.
    The hen has laid an egg.

    To lie is an intransitive verb, which cannot take an object. The following examples illustrate the use of the Present Continuous, Simple Past, and Present Perfect tenses of the verb to lie.
    e.g. She is lying on the sofa.
    We lay on the beach in the sun.
    He has lain in bed for a week.

    In these examples, it might appear that the words sofa, beach, and bed act as objects of the verb to lie. However, this is not the case.

    Not only verbs, but also prepositions have the ability to take objects. A few commonly used English prepositions are at, by, for, from, in, of, on, to and with. Prepositions will be discussed in detail in a later chapter.

    In the examples above, sofa, and beach are objects of the preposition on; and bed is the object of the preposition in.

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    Question Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Umut HIZAR
    1. Direct objects

    Most of the verbs examined so far have been in the Active Voice. When a verb is in the Active Voice, the subject of the verb refers to the person or thing performing the action described by the verb; and the object of the verb refers to the person or thing receiving the action described by the verb.

    In the following examples, the objects of the verbs are printed in bold type.
    e.g. He read the book.
    I did not see the balloon.
    They ate the potatoes quickly.
    She rode her bicycle along the sidewalk.
    Do we understand it?

    In these sentences, the verbs read, did see, ate, rode and do understand are in the Active Voice; and the words book, balloon, potatoes, bicycle and it are the objects of the verbs. These objects are said to be direct objects, because they refer to things which receive directly the actions described by the verbs.



    2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

    Verbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.

    Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to fly is intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.

    However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.
    Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
    Transitive: to lay laid laid
    Intransitive: to lie lay lain

    Transitive: to raise raised raised
    Intransitive: to rise rose risen

    Transitive: to set set set
    Intransitive: to sit sat sat


    Particular care must be taken not to confuse the verbs to lay and to lie, since, as shown above, the Simple Past of the verb to lie has the same form as the bare infinitive of the verb to lay.

    a. To Lay and To Lie
    To lay is a transitive verb, which can take an object. The following examples illustrate the use of the Present Continuous, Simple Past, and Present Perfect tenses of the verb to lay. The verbs are underlined, and the objects of the verbs are printed in bold type.
    e.g. I am laying the table.
    He laid a bet on the white horse.
    The hen has laid an egg.

    To lie is an intransitive verb, which cannot take an object. The following examples illustrate the use of the Present Continuous, Simple Past, and Present Perfect tenses of the verb to lie.
    e.g. She is lying on the sofa.
    We lay on the beach in the sun.
    He has lain in bed for a week.

    In these examples, it might appear that the words sofa, beach, and bed act as objects of the verb to lie. However, this is not the case.

    Not only verbs, but also prepositions have the ability to take objects. A few commonly used English prepositions are at, by, for, from, in, of, on, to and with. Prepositions will be discussed in detail in a later chapter.

    In the examples above, sofa, and beach are objects of the preposition on; and bed is the object of the preposition in.
    WOW thanks too complete answer!

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    Question Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    The term "nontransitive" refers to verbs that are not transitive, which leaves intransitive verbs, ergative/unaccusative verbs, and possibly (depending on how you view it) copular/linking verbs.

    The verbs "elect", "consider", and "name" are called complex-transitive verbs.
    so dear can we say that in this sentence:
    " she has a book"
    has:nontransitive verb
    book:predicate complement

    is it ok base on what you explain?
    all the best

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    Default Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    Dear?

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    Default Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    Welcome, Umut. <love the picture!>

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    Default Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    "Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to fly is intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane."

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    Default Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Welcome, Umut. <love the picture!>
    Thanks , I've just wanted to throw a few pennies in my pocket.

  10. #10
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    Question Re: intransitive & nontransitive verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Dear?
    yes i miss your name (i mean dear Casiopea)!
    so can we say that in this sentence:
    " she has a book"
    has:nontransitive verb
    book:predicate complement

    is it ok base on what you explain?
    all the best

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