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Thread: type of object

  1. 1364's Avatar
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    #1

    Question type of object

    Hi everybody:
    I wanna know all kinds of object which is used in these sentences:

    (1)his friends call(V) tom(DO) their chief authority (OC)on light(OP).??right?

    (2)a lump of fat fastened to the end of a stick was a torch.??

    Kindest regards

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: type of object

    [1] His friends call (V) Tom (DO) their chief authority (OC) on light (OP).
    Hint: "on" is a preposition; "light" functions as its object, and "on light" describes "chief authority".

    [2] A lump of fat fastened to the end of a stick was a torch.
    Hint: fat is fastened to the end (copular structure)

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    #3

    Question Re: type of object

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    [1] His friends call (V) Tom (DO) their chief authority (OC) on light (OP).
    Hint: "on" is a preposition; "light" functions as its object, and "on light" describes "chief authority".

    [2] A lump of fat fastened to the end of a stick was a torch.
    Hint: fat is fastened to the end (copular structure)
    thanks amillion dear Casiopea:would ya plz describe (copular structure) for me?
    best wishes

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: type of object

    The verb BE (am, is, are, was, were, been, will) is a copular verb. It joins the subject with its complement. A subject complement describes the subject, and it can be a noun, an adjective, a prepositional phrase or an adverb.

    In other words, 'fastened to the end of a stick" describes the noun "fat".

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    #5

    Re: type of object

    When the forms of be function as linking verbs, they either connect adjectives that describe the subject, or nouns that rename or are the same as the subject, with the subject.

    Lassie is cranky. Cranky is an adjective complement that describes the subject Lassie. Adjectives that follow linknig verbs are called predicate adjectives and they describe subjects exclusively..

    Lassie is a dog. Dog is a noun complement that renames or is the same as the subject Lassie. These predicate nominaitve complements rename subjects exclusively.

    A complement completes the message started by the subject and the verb. Adverbs and prepositional phrases never function as subject complements.

    Fastened to the end of the stick is a participial phrase.
    Last edited by Tdol; 10-Oct-2005 at 11:48.

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: type of object

    Yes, it functions as an adjective (Note, BE insertion Test: fat is fastened to the end of a stick), and sometimes it's best to allow the student to figure it out.

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    #7

    Re: type of object

    Misguided students seldom figure out anything. Your end run relating to the forms of be does little to teach students about participial phrases, and your misinformation about adverbs and prepositional phrases functioning as subject complements does little to enhance your credibility.
    Last edited by red pencil; 10-Oct-2005 at 16:47.

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    #8

    Re: type of object

    Welcome, RP.

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    #9

    Re: type of object

    Quote Originally Posted by red pencil
    Adverbs and prepositional phrases never function as subject complements.
    How about something like He's on the ball?

  7. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #10

    Re: type of object

    Nice example, tdol. But RP's heated remarks are in reference to my previous statement,

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    A subject complement describes the subject, and it can be a noun, an adjective, a prepositional phrase or an adverb.

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