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Thread: Th sound

  1. #1
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Th sound

    I learned from some phonics book.Th sounds have a beginning sound and an ending sound. However, I learned from the internet, there are voice and voiceless Th sounds .


    When the Th sound as a beginning sound, does it have voice or voiceles sounds?.
    However, when the Th sound as an ending sound, does it have voice or voiceless sounds?.

    Quoted "There are actually two different "th" sounds in English, but they are very similar. Both "th" sounds are made putting your tongue between your teeth so that the tip of your tongue is touching the tips of your top teeth.....

    However, when I watched some video from the web, the th sounds sound differently e.g like "f" and "W"

    Would be obligied for your help!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Th sound

    The voiceless sound can occur at the beginnining of the word, thick, thistle and at the end, bath, south.

    The voiced sound, too, can occur at the beginning of the word, this, there, and at the end, with, teethe.


  3. #3
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    Question Re: Th sound

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    The voiceless sound can occur at the beginnining of the word, thick, thistle and at the end, bath, south.

    The voiced sound, too, can occur at the beginning of the word, this, there, and at the end, with, teethe.
    Hi fivejedjion

    Many thanks.

    The voice& voiceless sound can both occur at the beginnining of the word. When the word begins with "Th", how can the kids determine whether to use voice or voiceless sound .
    Is there any criteria for this?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Th sound

    "In the definite article, and other determiners, and in pronouns, conjunctions and pronominal adverbs, it is // as in this,... though, ... thus. Otherwise it is /θ/ as in three, ... thing, ...thread."

    LPD

  5. #5
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Th sound

    Rider: If an unknown word is in the position of a noun/adjective/verb/adverb the sound is /θ/:

    Thy [archaic equivalent of 'your'] thick thigh is that much thinner than theirs.
    /_________________________θ____θ____________θ________/



    b

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    Default Re: Th sound

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Rider: If an unknown word is in the position of a noun/adjective/verb/adverb the sound is /θ/:

    Thy [archaic equivalent of 'your'] thick thigh is that much thinner than theirs.
    /_________________________θ____θ____________θ________/



    b
    Hi BobK

    Thanks

    What do you mean by " If an unknown word is in the position of a noun/adjective/verb/adverb"?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Th sound

    Quote Originally Posted by bh1234 View Post
    What do you mean by " If an unknown word is in the position of a noun/adjective/verb/adverb"?
    .1.................................................. ......2......3......4...5......6.......7..........8........9
    Thy [archaic equivalent of 'your'] thick thigh is that much thinner than theirs.
    /_________________________θ____θ____________θ________/

    Positions 2,3,4,6 and 7 will be filled (if they are filled) by nouns, adjectives, verbs or adverbs; #4 might be thickens, #7 might be more-thrustingly. These are /θ/ words.

    Positions #1, 5, 8 and 9 will be filled (if they are filled) by the definite article, other determiners, pronouns, conjunctions or pronominal adverbs These are // words

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Th sound

    Quote Originally Posted by bh1234 View Post
    Hi BobK

    Thanks

    What do you mean by " If an unknown word is in the position of a noun/adjective/verb/adverb"?
    5jj has explained, but here's another way of answering your question, using a version of the Wug test - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

    If I say to you 'This is a thwilp', you know that - although it's nonsense - 'thwilp' is in the position of a noun. You could replace it with many other nouns: dog, day, dream, thunderstorm, mystery...

    In 'This thwilp is thrumpy', 'thrumpy' is in the position of an adjective.

    In 'This thwilp is threnchily thrumpy', 'threnchily' is in the position of an adverb.

    In 'This threnchily thrumpy thwilp is tharping me', 'tharping' is in the position of a verb.

    b

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