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  1. #1
    birgit33 is offline Member
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    Default "Keep your car doors locked, and your windows rolled up..."

    "Keep your car doors locked, and your windows rolled up at all times." Is this a command which makes it a compound sentence with 2 hidden subjects (you) inside the sentence ? Or is it a simple sentence ? I think it's a compound sentence.
    Last edited by birgit33; 14-Oct-2011 at 01:42.

  2. #2
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "Keep your car doors locked, and your windows rolled up..."

    [QUOTE=birgit33;811150]"Keep your car doors locked, and your windows rolled up at all times."


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I most respectfully and humbly suggest that this sentence is a simple sentence.

    (2) Let's simplify it for easier analysis:

    (You) + keep + doors (locked) and windows (rolled up).

    (3) You = subject.

    (4) keep = verb.

    (5) doors = object ("locked" is objective complement of "doors," describing the state of the door).

    (6) windows = object ("rolled up" is objective complement of "windows," describing the ...).

    (7) doors and windows = compounded object.

    (8) I respectfully suggest that the comma after "locked" should not be there. It has

    given the false impression of the sentence being a compound one, which -- IMHO -- it

    definitely is not.

    (9) It is similar to any other command with a compounded object:

    Eat up all your broccoli and tomatoes!

    (10) It could be analyzed as a compound sentence only if the speaker's intention was

    to order:

    You keep your doors locked, and you keep your windows rolled up at all times!

    Of course, I do not know the intentions of the speaker, but I humbly suggest that the

    speaker was saying:

    Keep doors locked and windows rolled up!

    (Of course, if a teacher shows my analysis to be flawed, I shall immediately delete this post. We non-teachers are warned against misleading readers.)

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "Keep your car doors locked, and your windows rolled up..."

    My view is that as there are two verb-object pairs the comma is unexceptionable. If it were 'Keep your doors and windows shut' on the other hand there'd be no need for a comma. But I don't really see the value of calling the original sentence compound.

    PS I'm happy for TP's analysis to remain.

    b

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