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  1. #1
    menueditor is offline Newbie
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    Is "Loose weight" true?

    I know "reduce fat" means "lose weight", but counld I said "loose weight"?

    thanks.

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Is "Loose weight" true?

    Quote Originally Posted by menueditor View Post
    I know "reduce fat" means "lose weight", but counld I said "loose weight"?.
    No

  3. #3
    menueditor is offline Newbie
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    Re: Is "Loose weight" true?

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    No

    Thanks for your reply and the correction

  4. #4
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    emka is offline Junior Member
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    Re: Is "Loose weight" true?

    Not a teacher

    Loose - with two "o" means "not attached", but if you slim down, i.e. if you lose weight, you get rid of fat attached to your waist or wherever.
    Your pants will be loose around your waist afterwards, though.

  5. #5
    menueditor is offline Newbie
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    Re: Is "Loose weight" true?

    Quote Originally Posted by emka View Post
    Not a teacher

    Loose - with two "o" means "not attached", but if you slim down, i.e. if you lose weight, you get rid of fat attached to your waist or wherever.
    Your pants will be loose around your waist afterwards, though.
    that's funny, it made me more easy to remember.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Is "Loose weight" true?

    It's a very common spelling mistake- the internet is full of people calling other people loosers when they mean losers.

  7. #7
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: Is "Loose weight" true?

    The problem seems to be the two non-pairs 'loose/lose' and 'choose/chose' In the first pair, the vowel stays the same (the same phoneme, that is) and the voicing of the fricative changes. In the second pair the voicing of the fricative remains unchanged, but the vowels are different. The spellings suggest they should be similar. The typo reinforces that. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the 2100 edition of a reputable dictionary agrees with the typo, and notes that a few users (especially those born before the turn of the 20th centiury) preserve the old anomalous spelling - just as there are still a few people who spell 'show' 'shew'.

    b

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