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Thread: to be/will be

  1. #1
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    Default to be/will be

    "If the construction work is not to be executed, the Parties will have no further obligations toward each other."

    "If the construction work will not be executed, the Parties will have no further obligations toward each other."

    Is there a difference in meaning here between "to be" and "will be"? The latter seems stronger to me; it suggests the work will definitely not be executed.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: to be/will be

    Why not just

    If the construction work is not executed...

    ?

  3. #3
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: to be/will be

    I'll give you a better example.

    "If the construction work defined in this contract is to be executed, the Parties envisage to continue working together."

    "Is executed" wouldn't work here.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: to be/will be

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen165 View Post
    I'll give you a better example.

    "If the construction work defined in this contract is to be executed, the Parties envisage to continue working together."

    "Is executed" wouldn't work here.
    Yes it would, IMO. Also, it would be better with "...the parties envisage continuing to work together".

  5. #5
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: to be/will be

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Yes it would, IMO. Also, it would be better with "...the parties envisage continuing to work together".
    Ok, but then the meaning would be different. In any case, my question was whether there was a difference in meaning between "to be" and "will be," not whether there was a better way of writing the sentence.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: to be/will be

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen165 View Post
    In any case, my question was whether there was a difference in meaning between "to be" and "will be," not whether there was a better way of writing the sentence.
    The difference is between is to be and will be.

    "If the construction work is not to be executed, the Parties will have no further obligations toward each other."
    "If the construction work will not be executed, the Parties will have no further obligations toward each other."


    Yes there is.

    I know you are not after alternatives, but, apart from anything else, the second one is fairly unnatural English. If we are talking about a simple future possibility, the more normal expression would be , as BC suggested, if the construction work is not executed. If volition is involved, it would be if either or both of the parties will not execute the construction work (construction work cannot express volition); if we are using a rather dated legalistic English for a simple future, then it might be if the construction work shall not be executed.

    None of these three (or your second sentence) means exactly the same as your first sentence.

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