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  1. #1
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Three doubts in one sentence

    - The jouney took her long but she preferred to travel/travelling by train. She was scared of the flight and it was too long away/faraway/ far-off to drive/ for driving.

    1) Which do you think is more suitable between "to travel" and "travelling"? I do not think "travelling" goes well in this sentence because we are not talking about general actions...
    2) Which is correct: long away, faraway, far-off? and Why?
    3) Which would sound more natural between "to drive" and "for driving"? Are they both grammatically correct?

  2. #2
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    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Three doubts in one sentence

    I would say: The journey took (her) a long time but she preferred to travel by train. She was scared of the flight, and it was too far to drive.

    The affirmative equivalent of it won't take long is it will take a long time.
    Last edited by 5jj; 17-Oct-2011 at 21:21. Reason: typos corrected

  3. #3
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Three doubts in one sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I would say: The jouney took (her} a long time but she preferred to travelby train. She was scared of the flight, and it was too far to drive.

    The affirmative equivalent of it won't take long is it will take a long time.
    Thanks so much... But could you please explain me why "to drive" and not "for driving"? I'd like to understand the grammatical rule if there's one... Or are they both acceptable?
    As far as the "far" is concerned, you wrote: "and it was too far..."; what about the three solutions I had written? Why were not they possibile? I'd like to understand it to avoid having further doubts in future...

  4. #4
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Three doubts in one sentence

    Thanks so much... But could you please explain me why "to drive" and not "for driving"? I'd like to understand the grammatical rule if there's one... Or are they both acceptable?
    As far as the "far" is concerned, you wrote: "and it was too far..."; what about the three solutions I had written? Why were not they possibile? I'd like to understand it to avoid having further doubts in future...

  5. #5
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    Re: Three doubts in one sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    ... could you please explain me why "to drive" and not "for driving"? I'd like to understand the grammatical rule if there's one... Or are they both acceptable?
    Things are "Too adjective
    to verb" (the to-infinitive) or "Too adjective for noun" As the gerund is used as a noun, it is possible to say such things as"It was too cold for driving" in the sense of 'the cold made driving impossible", but "it was too far for driving" does not work..
    As far as the "far" is concerned, you wrote: "and it was too far..."; what about the three solutions I had written? Why were not they possibile? I'd like to understand it to avoid having further doubts in future.
    'Faraway' as a single word is used only directly before a noun, as in "I dream of faraway places'. You could use 'far away' as two words in your sentence. 'Far-off' as a hyphenated word is also used only directly before a noun. Once again, you could use two words in your sentence
    We do not use 'long away' for distance..
    Sorry about the typos in my post. I have now corrected it to read, " I would say: The journey took (her) a long time but she preferred to travel by train. She was scared of the flight, and it was too far to drive."



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