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  1. Rachel
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    #1

    Exclamation English Exam on Monday! Help!

    Hi there! I am having a little bit of trouble with the grammar that I have to learn by my exam on Monday. I totally get the obvious: verbs, adjectives, nouns and whatnot... but what I am confused about are the following:
    1. noun categories- object (receives the action), subject (does the action), object of the preposition... this is what I DO NOT understand. My notes say that is FOLLOWS the preposition. Now prepositions in themselves confuse me. I have a list of them, at, in, beside, on, etc. But I still don't get what an object of a preposition is??

    2. Conjunction- just to make sure... a coordinating conjunction is, and/but/or right? That means it's equal. But how do you KNOW when it is SUBORDINATING? I know what they are: because, therefore, since, while... and my teacher told me that is when one is less important than the other... but do you have a better explanation for me?

    Thanks!
    - Rachel

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    Objects of prepositions are nouns that come after a preposition. For example,

    EX: I went into the hotel.
    EX: They asked me about Max.
    EX: The car is parked behind the house.

    Prepositions never stand alone. They need an object. The two go hand-in-hand. If you spot a preposition, you'll know its object is close by. (Here's a way to find prepositions quickly and easily. Ask, is it something a cat can do? For example, can a cat go "into", can a cat go "about", can a cat go "behind"? Why memorize a list? Use the "cat test". )

    =============

    Coordinating conjunctions join words or phrases or sentences:

    I read.
    I like books
    => I read and I like books.

    Subordinating conjunctions add information. The clauses they introduce cannot stand alone:

    I read.
    because I like books.
    => I read because I like books.

    If you say, "because I like books" on its own, without additional context, your audience won't know what you mean. "because I like books" cannot stand alone. It needs more.

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    #3

    Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    aha
    very interseting and useful idea
    thanks a lot Casipea

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    #4

    Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    thanks dear casiopea for the explanation
    great idea ( cat test )


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    #5

    Smile Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    Wow thank you SO much! You have no idea how much that helps! Hmm... i think i get it all now! Haha, thanks again.

    - Rachel

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    #6

    Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    [QUOTE=Casiopea]
    (Here's a way to find prepositions quickly and easily. Ask, is it something a cat can do? For example, can a cat go "into", can a cat go "about", can a cat go "behind"? Why memorize a list? Use the "cat test". )

    first I would like to thanks Mr casiopea for the explanation
    but I didn't understand what do you mean by ( cat test )
    if it's possible may you explain and give more informations about it

    best wishes


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    #7

    Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    Uh oh. Okay this is really late so im hoping that you can still help out... well not that late, 7:15 pm for me. Anyways, was is an indirect object exactly? I don't really get it... anymore great tricks for me?

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    Indirect objects and direct objects go hand-in-hand. They're a set pair. The indirect object tells us to whom or for whom the action of the verb is done[/b]. For example,

    [1] She showed us her house.
    TEST
    Q: To whom was the action done?
    A: To us.
    => "us" functions as the direct object of the verb, and "her house" functions as the direct object.

    [2] She baked me a cake.
    Q: For whom was the cake baked?
    A: For me.
    => "me" functions as an indirect object.

    The verb "show" and "give", and others (e.g., bring, tell, take, offer) are called ditransitive verbs. They have two objects. The object that comes directly after the verb is the indirect object (Oi) and the one that comes directly after the indirect object is the direct object (Od):

    EX: I gave her (Oi) a book (Od).

    With ditransitive verbs it's possible to change the word order, like this,

    EX: I gave a book (Od) to her.

    The direct object "a book" now comes directly after the verb "gave", and "her" loses its indirect object status. It's no longer an indirect object. It's now the object of the preposition "to":

    EX: I gave a book (Od) to her (Op).

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: English Exam on Monday! Help!

    The "cat test". If you want to know if a word is a preposition or not, try this test:

    [1] Ask the question, "Can a cat go ______?"

    EX: Can a cat go up? Yes! "up" is a preposition.
    EX: Can a cat go sofa? No! "sofa" is not a preposition.

    [2] Make sure the preposition has an object:

    EX: I walked up the hill. (preposition + object)

    [3] Make sure you can't move the preposition around:

    EX: I hung up the phone. ~ I hung the phone up.

    If you can move it around, then it's not functioning as a preposition. "up" is something a cat can do, but we can move it around the sentence, [3], so it's not functioning as a preposition. It's an adverb.

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